Originals

There is striking parallel between Ronald Reagan's environmental wrecking crew of years past and the current administration. Here is part 2 in a series looking back at Reagan rollbacks and characters.

Read part 1 on Reagan's Interior Secretary, James Watt.

Keep reading... Show less

Female mice exposed to a mixture of 23 chemicals used in oil and gas fracking developed mammary lesions and enlarged tissues—suggesting the chemicals may leave breast tissues more prone to cancer, according to a new study.

Keep reading... Show less

A large proportion of California's nitrogen oxide—which can cause harmful ozone and a variety of health impacts—comes from heavy fertilizer use in the state's Central Valley, according to a new study.

Keep reading... Show less

On Tuesday, President Donald J. Trump will take the podium to renew the annual American tradition of the State of the Union Address (SOTU). His audience will include both houses of Congress, some special guests, and most of the memberships of the Supreme Court, Cabinet, and the Joint Chiefs of the military.

Keep reading... Show less

Having a hard time staying on top of changes to federal science regulations and actions? A new website launched today has you covered.

Keep reading... Show less

More than a hundred cities—containing millions of people—will have water demands outstripping surface water supplies by 2050, according to a new analysis of climate change impacts on water.

Keep reading... Show less

Recent efforts by religious leaders to emphasize environmental stewardship, particularly as it relates to climate change, has led some scholars to argue there has been a "greening of Christianity."

Keep reading... Show less

In the early 1980's President Reagan and Interior Secretary James G. Watt proposed opening up virtually the entire U.S. coastline -- Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans -- to offshore oil exploration. Problem was, the oil industry had virtually no interest in entering most of the areas proposed.

Keep reading... Show less

Top Weekend News

Optimism for 2018? If that's what you're after, for goodness sake, don't look here. The implosion of U.S. environmental politics in 2017 is likely to worsen in 2018. But there are some hopeful signs on the horizon.

Keep reading... Show less

It's been a dark and stormy year for U.S. climate advocates since President Trump's election.

Keep reading... Show less

I'm proud of our work over the past year. Engaged readers like you made it possible, and I hope you'll take a moment to see what impact you had – and what opportunities lie ahead of us. Because you should be proud, too.

Keep reading... Show less

Editor's note: What did we miss here? We want to hear from you! Send us your thoughts on the most important stories from 2017 and what we need to watch for in 2018. Send your comments to our senior editor, Brian Bienkowski, at bbienkowski@ehn.org.

Keep reading... Show less

The amount of floorspace in buildings around the world—currently about 2.5 trillion square feet—is set to double by 2060, and researchers say this is a major problem for the climate.

Keep reading... Show less

A busy week for Trump rollbacks, wildfires, and more. Get your essential news here.

Keep reading... Show less

Oysters, horse-trading the environment for tax bill votes, and much more.

Keep reading... Show less

We all know our physical world is changing. The news world is, too. And so have we.

Keep reading... Show less

Hard to stay on top of what's important? This is why we drink so much coffee.

Keep reading... Show less

Welcome to the weekend! We spent the week showcasing rural unrest and the impact of Big Pig in the United States. World leaders in Bonn fell short in producing a robust Paris rulebook.

Keep reading... Show less
Environmental Health News
FOLLOW US:
SUBSCRIBE:
Journalism that drives the discussion
Copyright © 2017 Environmental Health Sciences. All rights reserved.