Scientists just found a surprising possible consequence from a very small amount of global warming.

Even minor global warming could worsen super El Niños, scientists find. Washington Post

Home sweet home: Islanders stay put even when the sea invades.

Islanders in the Philippines have stayed in their homes even after an earthquake caused subsidence and floods, according to a study on Monday that questions how far global warming will trigger mass migration as sea levels rise. Reuters

Warming seas endanger Antarctic ecosystem, and billion-dollar fishing industry.

A few small islands off the coast of Antarctica are the incubator for nearly all the marine life around the world’s southernmost continent. Fairfield WSHU Public Radio Group, Connecticut

So what if we’re doomed?

Climate chaos, mass extinction, the collapse of civilization: A guide to facing the ecocide. High Country News

Thirsty city: After months of water rationing Nairobi may run dry.

The rains have been poor while demand for water grows along with the city - there are solutions but they will mean radical action. The Guardian

Romans threatened with water rationing as Italy's heatwave drags on.

More than a million residents of Rome are facing water rationing for up to eight hours a day as the prolonged heatwave that has ravaged southern Europe takes its toll on the Italian capital. The Guardian

‘In nearly 100 years Phoenix will be too hot to live in’: Heat waves, climate change and Trump’s EPA.

This June and June 2016 were the hottest on record for that month in Arizona and some worry it’s going to get worse if carbon emissions continue to propel climate change. Phoenix Business Journal, Arizona

Extreme El Niño events more frequent even if warming limited to 1.5C - report.

International scientists have released new modelling that projects drought-causing El Niño events, which pull rainfall away from Australia, will continue increasing in frequency well beyond any stabilisation of the climate. Australian Associated Press

UK should increasingly expect record winter rains, says Met Office.

Fears have been raised that the UK could soon see a repeat of the sort of flooding that has hit in recent years after forecasters predicted a one-in-three chance there would be a new record set for monthly rainfall during coming winters. The Guardian

If you’ve ever had Lyme disease, blame the anti-vaxxers.

In 1998 the FDA approved a a drug called Lymerix, and it was pretty effective until the chronic Lyme crowd and the anti-vaxxers started ranting: Mother Jones

The battle over 2,500-year-old shelters made of poop.

A falcon war in Greenland’s frigid north is a preview of habitat contests to come. The Atlantic

A rich town's choice: Protect its homes or save the beach?

The sandy beach in front of homes in this north San Diego County town is shrinking, and the high tide is edging closer. ClimateWire

Sea level rise could bring costly flooding in coastal communities within decades.

As glaciers melt amid the heat of a warming planet, scientists predict that coastal communities in the United States could eventually experience flooding from higher tides. San Diego Union-Tribune, California

With more ships in the Arctic, fears of disaster rise.

A decline in sea ice is allowing more marine travel, but experts say the remote region is unprepared to face an emergency at sea. New York Times

As the climate changes, Kenyan herders find centuries-old way of life in danger.

Nomadic herders have lived off the vast expanses of grass in the Rift Valley for centuries. But recently, as the climate has changed, the grass here has died and a way of life that has existed for centuries is in danger. Weekend Edition, NPR

How Mongolia′s nomads are adapting to climate change.

Harsh winters and dry summers are threatening the livelihoods of Mongolia's nomadic herders. Some are banding together to safeguard their herds - and communities - from the extreme conditions. Deutsche Welle, Germany

What do 10,000 Europeans know about climate change and the sea?

An ambitious survey reveals that when it comes to marine issues, most Europeans show greater awareness of pollution and overfishing than the effects of specific climate change threats, such as ocean acidification. Anthropocene Magazine

Costa Rica’s Caribbean coast pools efforts against climate change.

It is a recurring pattern among Central American countries and each country is seeking its solutions. Inter Press Service

Storms add to Nags Head’s flooding woes.

Homes and businesses in Nags Head were inundated by rainwater twice in the span of six days recently by slow-moving thunderstorms that poured millions of gallons of water onto the town in less than two hours. Outer Banks Voice, North Carolina

Rome risks water rationing as drought-hit lake set to go offline.

Authorities have ordered a halt to pumping water out of a lake near Rome following a prolonged drought, a decision that could force city officials to impose water rationing in the Italian capital. Reuters

Worst drought in 16 years threatens food supplies in North Korea – U.N.

North Korea is facing severe food shortages due to the worst drought since 2001 with food imports needed to ensure children and the elderly do not go hungry, the United Nations' food agency said on Thursday. Reuters

The world’s most-populated city, Shanghai, just had its hottest day in recorded history.

On Friday, the 24-million-plus inhabitants of Shanghai witnessed the temperature skyrocket to 105.6 degrees (40.9 Celsius), its hottest day ever recorded. Washington Post

Is global warming changing the Southwest monsoon?

An international research team says monsoon storms in the Southwest have become less frequent but more intense, bringing more extreme wind and rain to central and southwestern Arizona than just a few decades ago. Summit County Citizens Voice, Colorado

Antarctica′s Larsen C ice shelf: New rift detected.

Where a trillion-ton iceberg calved last week, researchers have detected a new rift. The concern is that the Larsen C ice shelf will destabilize and collapse, releasing glacial ice into the sea. Deutsche Welle, Germany

Sea level rise is accelerating in Florida, scientists warn.

In dozens of locations along the state's 1,350-mile coastline, sea level rise is no longer an esoteric discussion or a puzzle for future generations to solve. It's happening now and is forecast to worsen over the next 20 to 30 years. Associated Press

Adaptation

As temperatures rise, poor Americans are thrust into the thick of it.

Climate change will fall hardest on low-income Americans, who are more likely to walk to work and toil outdoors than their counterparts. Undark

How Y2K offers a lesson for fighting climate change.

Some remember the computing scare as a bad joke. But the collective, worldwide effort to prevent it could be a model for handling global warming. New York Times

Resurrecting ancient wines that can survive climate change.

A Catalan winery is preparing for the industry’s future by reviving its past. The Atlantic

Extreme Weather

Climate study offers warnings for Florida farmers from global warming.

Scientists say future could hold bad news for Florida agriculture Florida strawberry growers already have experienced a dress rehearsal for the impacts of climate change during the past two seasons. Lakeland Ledger, Florida

With climate change driving child marriage risks, Bangladesh fights back.

Climate change-driven extreme weather - from flooding and mudslides to blistering heat - is accelerating migration to Bangladesh's cities, raising the risks of problems such as child marriage, according to UNICEF's head of Bangladesh programs. Thomson Reuters Foundation

This could be the next big strategy for suing over climate change.

Two California coastal counties and one beach-side city touched off a possible new legal front in the climate change battle this week, suing dozens of major oil, coal, and other fossil fuel companies for the damages they say they will incur due to rising seas. Washington Post

Editorials

Policing California’s most precious resource.

Water disputes are a fact of life in California, and the recent drought has only increased the stakes in their outcomes. That’s why it is concerning that a Merced Democrat wants to change the resolution process. more…

The climate threat.

Sustainable development that accounts for the impact of climate change is possible – but it needs very serious planning on the part of the government. more…

Losses get real as seas rise.

America’s coasts — especially the teeming, wealthy Eastern seaboard and Gulf shore — are doomed to drown in ever-worse flooding from sea rise caused by global warming. more…

How humans can avert mass extinctions of animals.

Unlike other creatures, humans can consciously shape the future for generations to come. We should use ingenuity for the benefit of the countless creatures with which we share the Earth. That would also be good for our species. more…

Opinion

How does climate change impact you?

Most people in Idaho believe climate change will not impact them. In reality, climate change is already impacting most of us in one way or another. more…

Fossil fuel industry should pay for rising sea level.

The hard-working, taxpaying residents and businesses in our communities should not have to foot the bill for the very real costs of sea level rise caused by the fossil fuel companies’ pollution. more…

Are we ready for a ‘managed retreat’ from the coasts — and from the forests?

If British Columbia were smart, we’d be reviewing our options now. more…

Solve Antarctica’s sea-ice puzzle.

We need to know whether crucial interactions and feedbacks between the atmosphere, ocean and sea ice are missing from global climate models, and to what extent human influences are implicated. more…