New way to find relevant news on our environment and health

EHN.org launches new map and "Smart Search" to better access its reporting archive; thousands of stories available

We drink from a firehose of daily information. Now EHN.org has a filter to break the daily news stream into relevant, manageable chunks.


EHN.org on Monday launched a new "smart search" and mapping function allowing users to quickly find stories of interest to them on a wide range of environmental health topics, from plastic pollution to biodiversity loss, endocrine disrupting compounds, toxics and more.

Every day, EHN editors and researchers hand-pick 50 to 70 top stories from around the world on our environment and health. The new map shows stories near you. The Smart Search allows you to sort that archive of thousands of stories by topic, author, source and more.

We live in a world awash in information. So much news flows by, from so many sources both trusted and questionable, that it's easy to get overwhelmed, freeze up, and lose perspective. EHN's mission, in many ways, is to fight that.

We offer a host of daily and weekly newsletters that feature the top 15 to 25 stories on a variety of topics, from a general environmental health summary in our daily Above the Fold to weekly aggregations of top news in plastics, population, energy, children's health and more. See the whole list here.

Check out our map and smart search here. And let us know how it works for you by taking a short six-question survey here.

Support real news: Donate today, keep the change tomorrow

While we have your attention...

We're an entirely grant- and reader-supported publication, nonpartisan to our core. Every morning our crew is up early, hustling to find, investigate and report on the most relevant environmental news of the day. Your support makes this possible.

We're in the middle of our mid-summer donation campaign. Support real news today and keep the change tomorrow.

Donate Now

Thank you for reading us. Thanks for being engaged.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

This is part 1 of our 4-part series, "Fractured," an investigation of fracking chemicals in the air, water, and people of western Pennsylvania.

Keep reading... Show less

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

www.bbc.com

'UK first' nuclear fusion plan for Nottinghamshire power station

A Nottinghamshire power station is put forward as a possible site for a prototype reactor.
www.bayjournal.com

Baltimore church converts neglected urban forest into ‘peace park’

Project to restore degraded woodlands in damaged community enlists help from all over.

www.newyorker.com

Bill McKibben: The shift to renewable energy can give more power to the people

We shouldn’t give up on the idea of democratizing energy ownership as much as possible.
news.mongabay.com

The possible meat: A Brazilian farmer shows ranching can regenerate the Cerrado

Matheus Sborgia, a Brazilian chef, decided to bet on regenerative agriculture after inheriting his grandfather's cattle ranch in the heart of the Cerrado.

news.mongabay.com

When Chinook salmon is off the menu, other prey will do for endangered orcas

For nearly 20 years, Robin Baird has been following killer whales, trying to figure out what they eat. At first, he would look to see what was in their mouths as the whales feasted on fish near the surface. But then he and his colleague, Brad Hanson, started looking for more subtle clues in their […]
news.mongabay.com

Facebook enabling Amazon land grabbing, deforestation, finds investigation

The illegal sale of protected land in the Brazilian Amazon has been going on for years, but a new BBC report got deeply inside the criminal network and found some land grabbers advertising on Facebook.