sponges

Top Tweets
Federal agencies move to protect climate science from political interference
Amid LNG’s Gulf Coast expansion, community hopes to stand in its way
US oil trade group challenges Biden administration's EV mandate in court
Trump anti-climate energy policies
Ocean-dwelling species are disappearing twice as quickly as land animals
www.smithsonianmag.com

Ocean-dwelling species are disappearing twice as quickly as land animals

Researchers point toward marine creatures' inability to adapt to changing water temperatures, lack of adequate shelter.

Newsletter
Could symbiotic microbes help ecosystems survive global warming?
phys.org

Could symbiotic microbes help ecosystems survive global warming?

Studies of the relationships between microbes and the organisms they live on are revealing how plants and animals could adapt to climate change.
Newsletter
Glass sponges, climate change and BC's ocean environment
thetyee.ca

Glass sponges, climate change and BC's ocean environment

New research on 'shapeshifters of the sea' highlights critical role in ecosystem.

Beyond biodiversity: A new way of looking at how species interconnect.

In a development that has important implications for conservation, scientists are increasingly focusing not just on what species are present in an ecosystem, but on the roles that certain key species play in shaping their environment.

In 1966, an ecologist at the University of Washington named Robert Paine removed all the ochre starfish from a short stretch of Pacific shoreline on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The absence of the predator had a dramatic effect on its ecosystem. In less than a year, a diverse tidal environment collapsed into a monoculture of mussels because the starfish was no longer around to eat them.

Keep reading...Show less

What needs to be done to stop wildfires in drought-killed forests.

A century of fire suppression followed by the worst drought in recorded history has put California’s forest landscapes and water supply at risk.

WITH 17 LARGE wildfires in California igniting in 24 hours this week, October is shaping up to be a brutal month for wildfires, as it often is. It’s too soon to know what caused multiple conflagrations spreading across Northern California’s wine country, but elsewhere in the state dead and dying trees have been the subject of much concern. The five-year drought in California killed more than 102 million trees on national forest lands. That is a gigantic problem in itself that will lead to huge wildfire risks in the future and big changes in wildlife habitat.

Keep reading...Show less

The water under Colorado’s Eastern Plains is running dry as farmers keep irrigating “great American desert.”

Farmers say they’re trying to wean from groundwater, but admit there are no easy answers amid pressures of corn prices, urban growth and interstate water agreements.

By BRUCE FINLEY | bfinley@denverpost.com

Keep reading...Show less

Sponges, urban forests and air corridors: How nature can cool cities.

As China battles the twin challenges of rapid city growth and extreme weather, it is adopting a new tactic: Turning its cities into giant sponges.

LONDON, Sept 26 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As China battles the twin challenges of rapid city growth and extreme weather, it is adopting a new tactic: Turning its cities into giant sponges.

Keep reading...Show less
ORIGINAL REPORTING
MOST POPULAR
CLIMATE