Originals

Hurricane Florence ravaged North Carolina last fall. While cleanup continues and residents pick up the pieces of their life, many people in New Bern, a small community along the Neuse River in the eastern part of the state, have nothing to pick up. Homes have been destroyed and won't be rebuilt. Lives have been upended.

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Editor's note: This story is part of a series examining the social and health injustices resulting from increasingly intense storms and is the result of a collaboration between EHN and Scalawag Magazine, an independent nonprofit magazine that covers the American South.

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The way we eat and grow food has to dramatically change if we're going to feed the world's increasing population by 2050 and protect the planet, according to a major report released today from the EAT-Lancet Commission.

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Even as Greenland melts, glaciers recede and Kilimanjaro sheds its equatorial snow, hell froze over in a corner of the media world last week.

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It was 1957. I was born. Elizabeth had been queen for four years. Elvis had been king for one, give or take.

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PITTSBURGH—My family's ties to Pittsburgh run deep.

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As reporters, we're used to asking questions.

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Like many Americans, I sat slackjawed this week as the two most powerful Democrats in the nation hectored the President as if they were both 12-year-olds. And the President, off on a tear about who would pay for his border wall, behaved like a 9-year-old.

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People who live near oil and gas operations are more likely to have early indicators of cardiovascular disease than those who don't, according to a recent study.

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In response to climate change, cities are cultivating the capacity of their inhabitants and core systems to adapt successfully to the future's new requirements.

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Two news items this week illustrate the sometimes-maddening struggle for environmental progress.

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Let's start with a multiple choice: If we were to turn the clock back 30 years, which of these two things did you think would happen, and which two did you think would not?

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This Tuesday, the 27th, is designated as Giving Tuesday. It's the day when we're encouraged, exhorted, and maybe a little guilt-tripped to support all manner of worthy causes.

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When news – particularly bad news – comes at you through a firehose, it's human nature that this week's headline horrors wash away last week's horrors.

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Every 45 minutes or so on Election Day, I was treated to the televised strains of "Come Fly With Me," a 1957 crooners' standard made famous by Frank Sinatra.

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For centuries, the Arctic has been a relatively safe place for shorebirds such as plovers and sandpipers to lay their eggs, as nests in the tropics were much more likely to suffer attacks from predators.

That is changing.

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Last month, three pieces of news hit us, and our environment, upside the head.

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Editor's note: This is a follow-up to yesterday's story, Fracking conference and opposing tribal rally highlight competing visions for Western Pennsylvania's future, which offers an in-depth explanation of the issues discussed below.

PITTSBURGH—Just after 10 a.m. today, a faithkeeper of the Wolf Clan of the Seneca Nation stood facing the water where the Ohio, Monongahela, and Allegheny rivers converge, and let out three sharp cries as a coal barge drifted beneath one of the city's iconic bridges.

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