soil quality

Top Tweets
Poll shows strong voter support for suing oil companies over climate impact
Amid LNG’s Gulf Coast expansion, community hopes to stand in its way
Trump vows to dismantle Biden’s electric vehicle policies
gardens biodiversity climate resilience
Helping the environment, one small sensor at a time
www.nytimes.com

Helping the environment, one small sensor at a time

New York City nonprofits are using a cloud-based service from the start-up Temboo that helps monitor storm-water runoff and other environmental factors.
Cambodian "bat man" bolsters the fight against dengue fever

Cambodian "bat man" bolsters the fight against dengue fever

Climate change puts over half the world's population at risk of mosquito-borne diseases like dengue fever, and bats may be able to help.

Can dirt save the Earth?
www.nytimes.com

Can dirt save the Earth?

Agriculture could pull carbon out of the air and into the soil — but it would mean a whole new way of thinking about how to tend the land.
UNEA mercury control plan blow to coal plant
www.the-star.co.ke

UNEA mercury control plan blow to coal plant

Kenya may find it difficult attracting support for the planned coal plants following a raft of resolutions made at the just ended United Nations Environment Assembly.

Carbon emissions from warming soils could trigger disastrous feedback loop.

26-year study reveals natural biological factors kick in once warming reaches certain point, leading to potentially unstoppable increase in temperatures.

Warming soils are releasing more carbon into the atmosphere than previously thought, suggesting a potentially disastrous feedback mechanism whereby increases in global temperatures will trigger massive new carbon releases in a cycle that may be impossible to break.

Keep reading...Show less

Farmer wants a revolution: 'How is this not genocide?'

Health comes from the ground up, Charles Massy says – yet chemicals used in agriculture are ‘causing millions of deaths’. Susan Chenery meets the writer intent on changing everything about the way we grow, eat and think about food.

The kurrajong tree has scars in its wrinkled trunk, the healed wounds run long and vertical under its ancient bark. Standing in front of the homestead, it nestles in a dip on high tableland from which there is a clear view across miles and miles of rolling plains to the coastal range of south-east Australia.

Keep reading...Show less

Can American soil be brought back to life?

A new idea: If we revive the tiny creatures that make dirt healthy, we can bring back the great American topsoil. But farming culture — and government — aren't making it easy.

Four generations of Jonathan Cobb’s family tended the same farm in Rogers, Texas, growing row upon row of corn and cotton on 3,000 acres. But by 2011, Cobb wasn’t feeling nostalgic. Farming was becoming rote and joyless; the main change from one year to the next was intensively planting more and more acres of corn and soy, churning up the soil and using ever more chemical fertilizers and herbicides to try and turn a profit.

Keep reading...Show less
ORIGINAL REPORTING
MOST POPULAR
CLIMATE