Impacts

The Agents of Change in Environmental Justice program, a partnership between Environmental Health News and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, is excited to announce our fifth group of fellows.

Keep reading...Show less

Artificial Intelligence is now challenging traditional methods in predicting extreme weather events, offering potentially more accurate forecasts.

Laura Bult reports for Vox.

Keep reading...Show less

The Arctic faces a new environmental challenge as rainfall increases, impacting wildlife and indigenous communities.

Ed Struzik reports for Yale E360.

Keep reading...Show less

A lawsuit alleges that BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil, and Shell have damaged Chicago by undermining scientific credibility, while their products contribute to devastating effects such as intense storms, floods, extreme heat, and coastal erosion.

Brett Chase reports for the Chicago Sun-Times.

Keep reading...Show less

The escalating thaw of Arctic permafrost, a critical factor in global climate change, faces research challenges due to a halt in scientific collaboration with Russia, hindering vital data collection and analysis.

Elizabeth Devitt reports for Mongabay.

Keep reading...Show less

Scientists delve into the complexities of chronic wasting disease and its transmission among wildlife, raising concerns about future health implications.

Jennifer Chesak reports for the BBC.

Keep reading...Show less

In the midst of unyielding downpours, Los Angeles' innovative "sponge" infrastructure successfully captured 8.6 billion gallons of water, providing enough resources to support more than 100,000 households for an entire year.

Matt Simon reports for WIRED.

Keep reading...Show less

Federal authorities have denied permits for hydroelectric projects on Navajo land, marking a significant step in recognizing tribal sovereignty in energy projects.

Noel Lyn Smith and Wyatt Myskow report for Inside Climate News.

Keep reading...Show less

The escalating global food crisis, fueled by climate change, extreme weather, and conflicts, is pushing millions into hunger and malnutrition, signaling an unprecedented challenge in global food security.

Abdulkareem Mojeed, Priscilla Misiekaba-Kia, Vitor Alexandre Araujo Prado dos Anjos report for Mongabay.

Keep reading...Show less

In Florida, farmworkers have pioneered the strongest workplace heat protections in the U.S., setting a new standard for labor safety in agriculture.

Nicolás Rivero and Eva Marie Uzcategui report for The Washington Post.
Keep reading...Show less

Every home in the Bay Area is at high risk of experiencing poor air quality due to wildfires, a stark contrast to its status as one of the most expensive housing markets.

Christian Leonard reports for The San Francisco Chronicle.

Keep reading...Show less

Sonya Sanders, a Philadelphia resident, grapples with the lasting psychological impact of living near the PES Refinery, a site marked by pollution and health hazards.

Victoria St. Martin reports for Inside Climate News.

Keep reading...Show less

A combination of drought and extreme weather has led to a dramatic decrease in crawfish availability, impacting the economy and culture in the southern United States.

Xander Peters reports for National Geographic.

Keep reading...Show less

The critical balance between human activity and the Earth's natural climate regulators is beginning to tip — and not in a good way.

Andrew Jeong reports for The Washington Post.

Keep reading...Show less

The Arctic's rapid warming is causing significant shifts in ecosystems, posing severe threats to the region's wildlife.

Sharon Guynup reports for Mongabay.

Keep reading...Show less

Women living in Bangladesh's coastal regions are severely affected by climate change-induced salinity, leading to various health complications.

Famiha Suhrawardy reports for Dhaka Tribune.

Keep reading...Show less

In a landmark decision, a Montana judge has blocked a new housing development, citing inadequate groundwater protection.

Christopher Flavelle reports for The New York Times.

Keep reading...Show less

In response to rising temperatures, Australian native animals like kangaroos are adopting unique behaviors to stay cool.

Amelia Searson reports for ABC News.

Keep reading...Show less
FOLLOW US:
SUBSCRIBE:
Journalism that drives the discussion
Copyright © 2017 Environmental Health Sciences. All rights reserved.