Impacts

As rising summer temperatures worsen, restaurant workers are unionizing and striking to combat unbearable working conditions.

Frida Garza reports for Grist.

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As New York City braces for another hot summer, 80 neighborhoods are identified as highly vulnerable to heat, with many of these areas being low-income communities or communities of color.

Alastair Lee Bitsóí reports for Inside Climate News.

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Predictions of extreme weather events are increasingly affecting food prices, driving up costs even before actual climate shocks occur.

Ayurella Horn-Muller reports for Grist.

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Increasingly severe flooding is costing the U.S. economy between $179.8 and $496 billion each year, according to new data from the Senate Joint Economic Committee.

Andrew Freedman reports for Axios.

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Small farmers in Brazil's semi-arid region struggle with land degradation due to climate change and past government neglect, but the new administration aims to prioritize land restoration and seek international funding.

Giovanna Carneiro and Inácio França report for Inside Climate News.

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Flooding, increasingly severe due to extreme weather, is costing the U.S. economy between $179.8 and $496 billion annually, according to new Senate Joint Economic Committee data.

Andrew Freedman reports for Axios.

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Researchers have detected a significant decrease in hydrochlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere, marking progress in global efforts to protect the ozone layer and mitigate climate change.

Sarah Kaplan reports for The Washington Post.

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To mitigate the impact of climate change, wealthy nations like the U.S. need to take responsibility and provide reparations to countries most affected by global warming.

Vann R. Newkirk II reports for The Atlantic.

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With record-breaking heat waves sweeping the nation, researchers are highlighting the unique dangers that extreme temperatures pose to children.

Victoria St. Martin reports for Inside Climate News.

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A new study reveals tornado activity in the U.S. has moved from the Great Plains to the Southeast, increasing risks for denser populations and mobile home communities.

Matthew Cappucci reports for The Washington Post.

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In rural Marion County, Alabama, hundreds of households, including the McClungs, have been waiting for public water access for over a decade, relying on private wells to meet their daily needs.

Lee Hedgepeth reports for Inside Climate News.

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Research on Martian agriculture reveals that ancient farming techniques could help combat food scarcity on an increasingly arid Earth.

Ayurella Horn-Muller reports for Grist.

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Extreme heat, referred to as "heatflation," is pushing up food prices in the Middle East, exacerbating economic challenges in the region.

Cathrin Schaer and Emad Hassan report for Deutsche Welle.

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Increasing natural disasters driven by climate change are making insurance unaffordable or unavailable for many homeowners, especially in states like California, Florida, and Louisiana.

Alex Brown reports for Stateline.

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As erosion continues to threaten homes, some North Shore residents are resorting to illegal methods to protect their properties.

Annabelle Ink reports for Honolulu Civil Beat.

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As tourism and development surge in Terlingua, residents worry about depleting water resources, prompting debates over sustainability and future water availability.

Carlos Nogueras Ramos and Eli Hartman report for The Texas Tribune.

In short:

  • Terlingua's tourism and development have dramatically increased water demand, causing concerns about the sustainability of local water resources.
  • Residents like Rick and Georganne Bradbury, who haul water to locals, see wells running dry, while developers argue there is sufficient water for future growth.
  • Efforts are underway to better understand and manage the region's water resources amid growing concerns of shortages.

Key quote:

“There’s no way we can say, ‘There’s unlimited water supply, everyone come and take whatever you want,’”

— Brewster County Judge Greg Henington

Why this matters:

The dilemma facing Terlingua is one that many rural communities encounter as they grow: balancing development with sustainability. At the heart of the debate is the question of future water availability. Proposals to drill deeper wells or import water from other regions are being discussed, but these solutions are not without their challenges and controversies. Deeper wells could lead to further depletion of the aquifers, while importing water is costly and logistically complex.

Arizona is experiencing severe climate impacts, making climate change a critical issue for voters and politicians in the 2024 elections.

Marcus Baram reports for Capital & Main.

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With climate change exacerbating drought conditions, Texas farmers are increasingly reliant on heavily subsidized crop insurance, as costs continue to surge.

Dylan Baddour reports for Inside Climate News and Alejandra Martinez reports for the Texas Tribune.

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