Our 5 most read stories of 2020

Revisit the stories and words that most resonated with our readers.

It's always something of a mystery to see what most touches readers. Black food sovereignty, DuPont's pollution, fracking and horses—this year's most read stories from our newsroom reflect true diversity in the world of environmental health.


We were delighted to see that whether essay, straight science reporting, explainer piece, or investigative feature, our work can reach millions.

Don't miss out, see what others have been reading. Below are our top five most read stories from the past year.

1. We don't farm because it's trendy; we farm as resistance, for healing and sovereignty

For more than 150 years, from the rural South to northern cities, Black people have used farming to build self-determined communities and resist oppressive structures that tear them down.

2. A lasting legacy: DuPont, C8 contamination and the community of Parkersburg left to grapple with the consequences

"We all have stories of friends and family, neighbors, dying too young or being diagnosed with various medical problems"

3. Coronavirus, climate change, and the environment

A conversation on COVID-19 with the director of Harvard University's Center of Climate, Health and the Global Environment.

4. Fracking linked to rare birth defect in horses: Study

A new study has uncovered a link between fracking chemicals in farm water and a rare birth defect in horses—which researchers say could serve as a warning about fracking and human infant health.

5. Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Banner photo: Tracy Danzey grew up in polluted Parkersburg, West Virginia. (Courtesy Seth Freeman Photography)

The push for standing forest protections in US climate policy

Researchers say "proforestation" policies are the fastest and most effective way to draw excess CO2 out of the atmosphere.

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY, Mass.—Bob Leverett walked away from the trunk, looking up through the canopy, trying to get eyes on the crown.

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ADSE's Young Researchers Conference 2021

The Alliance for Diversity in Science and Engineering (ADSE) is hosting its 9th Young Researcher Conference from January 28-30th, 2021. Read more about the conference and how to register here.

southerlymag.org

The South’s communication infrastructure can’t withstand climate change

Much of the South's power and internet infrastructure is decades old, and increasingly failing communities during extreme weather events.

insideclimatenews.org

Could Baltimore’s climate change suit become a Supreme Court test case?

The high court agreed to hear a narrow issue related to jurisdiction. But then the oil and gas industry pushed it to go further.

Biden to 'hit ground running' as he rejoins Paris climate accords

President-elect to block Keystone XL pipeline among other swift environmental moves – but challenges lie ahead.

www.thetimes-tribune.com

Pennsylvania: State senators file suit to overturn fracking ban in Delaware River Basin

Two state senators and a Wayne County municipality filed a federal lawsuit that seeks to overturn a more than 10-year-old ban on natural gas exploration within the Delaware River Basin.