New way to find relevant news on our environment and health

EHN.org launches new map and "Smart Search" to better access its reporting archive; thousands of stories available

We drink from a firehose of daily information. Now EHN.org has a filter to break the daily news stream into relevant, manageable chunks.


EHN.org on Monday launched a new "smart search" and mapping function allowing users to quickly find stories of interest to them on a wide range of environmental health topics, from plastic pollution to biodiversity loss, endocrine disrupting compounds, toxics and more.

Every day, EHN editors and researchers hand-pick 50 to 70 top stories from around the world on our environment and health. The new map shows stories near you. The Smart Search allows you to sort that archive of thousands of stories by topic, author, source and more.

We live in a world awash in information. So much news flows by, from so many sources both trusted and questionable, that it's easy to get overwhelmed, freeze up, and lose perspective. EHN's mission, in many ways, is to fight that.

We offer a host of daily and weekly newsletters that feature the top 15 to 25 stories on a variety of topics, from a general environmental health summary in our daily Above the Fold to weekly aggregations of top news in plastics, population, energy, children's health and more. See the whole list here.

Check out our map and smart search here. And let us know how it works for you by taking a short six-question survey here.

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