Paul Ehrlich: 'Collapse of civilisation is a near certainty within decades.'

In May, it will be 50 years since the eminent biologist published his most famous and controversial book, The Population Bomb. But Ehrlich remains as outspoken as ever.

Fifty years after the publication of his controversial book The Population Bomb, biologist Paul Ehrlich warns overpopulation and overconsumption are driving us over the edge.


Ehrlich has been quite prolific in those 50 years, continually drawing connections among the different planetary forces shaping our health and environment – forces like biodiversity, the nitrogen cycle, climate change and yes, overpopulation. The concern that he shares with other scientists working in this field: These are force multipliers, coming harder and faster at civilization than any one issue by itself.

Veteran journalist Damian Carrington's interview with Ehrlich is excellent. Worth reading, too, is the website Ehrlich and other scientists have put together to explore these interconnections: The Millennium Alliance for Humanity and the Biosphere.

And if you want to keep abreast of this issue, every Saturday we publish a roundup of the best reporting we've seen that week probing the interplay of these different environmental issues. Get our "Science Saturday" newsletter free in your inbox by signing up here.

Read the full interview at The Guardian.

www.stltoday.com

On St. Louis visit, US secretary of agriculture talks climate change, dicamba, and more

"First of all, I don't agree with your premise that the administration is dismissive of climate change," said U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue.

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

Local impacts of wildfire smoke connected to rise in recent deaths, researchers say

California deaths due to wildfire smoke on the rise, as most of the state was exposed to heavy concentrations of dangerous chemicals during massive wildfires.
www.ctvnews.ca

Some polar bears are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice: study

New research shows that a small subpopulation of polar bears that used to live on thick, multiyear sea ice are getting a short-term benefit from the ice thinning as temperatures warm.
www.theguardian.com

What is carbon capture, usage and storage - and can it trap emissions?

Technology that can keep carbon dioxide emissions from entering the atmosphere and stoking global heating will be essential to tackle the growing climate crisis, experts say. But how does it work, and why will it make a difference in fighting climate breakdown?

MAP: See the toxic sites near you that are threatened by climate change

New Jersey has the most Superfund sites facing climate threats, followed by Florida, California and Pennsylvania.
Photo by Kouji Tsuru on Unsplash

Carney backs call for climate risk to be baked into company financial accounts

United Nations climate envoy Mark Carney on Thursday threw his weight behind a growing push by investors for companies to more accurately reflect climate-related risks in their financial accounts.
www.climatechangenews.com

Trudeau promises green jobs for Canada as his leadership hangs in the balance

Justin Trudeau promised to make climate action a "cornerstone" of Canada's coronavirus recovery plan, but has yet to win the backing he needs in parliament.