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New York Harbor & Clean Water Act
David Wilson/Flickr

John Waldman: Once an open sewer, New York Harbor now teems with life. Thank the Clean Water Act.

Bald eagles are back. So are humpback whales. And oysters. And more. Life has returned.
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golden eagle biodiversity wind energy

ESI Energy's wind turbines killed more than 100 eagles

An American wind energy company has admitted to killing at least 150 bald and golden eagles, most of which were fatally struck by wind turbine blades, federal prosecutors said.

Wind energy company to pay $8 million in killings of 150 eagles

Wind energy company to pay $8 million in killings of 150 eagles

ESI Energy pleaded guilty based on the documented “blunt force trauma” deaths of golden eagles struck by fast-moving turbine blades, prosecutors said.
America’s bald eagle population has quadrupled
www.nytimes.com

America’s bald eagle population has quadrupled

There were only about 72,000 bald eagles in the lower 48 states in 2009. Researchers say the population is now above 300,000.
Carl Safina: The new threat to endangered species? The Trump administration
Pete Myers

Carl Safina: The new threat to endangered species? The Trump administration

New rules will weaken the landmark law intended to save plants and animals on the brink.
Inside efforts to weaken the Endangered Species Act

Inside efforts to weaken the Endangered Species Act

The U.S. Endangered Species Act has saved more than 200 species from extinction—but business and political interests want to scuttle it.
Given room, Arizona's bald eagles soar beyond endangered species list
www.azcentral.com

Given room, Arizona's bald eagles soar beyond endangered species list

Bald eagles were on the brink of extinction and listed as an endangered species until 2007. They now nest in dozens of places around Arizona.
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