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'Katrina brain': The invisible long-term toll of megastorms.

Long after a big hurricane blows through, its effects hammer the mental-health system.

Bryan Tamowski for POLITICO

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AUDIO: 'A threat to the forces of denial and delay': Dr. Michael Mann on science facts after Irma.

We're joined by Penn State University climate scientist and author Dr. Michael E. Mann, to discuss what made Hurricanes Harvey and Irma so historically extraordinary (and deadly) and why now is absolutely the right time, despite claims to the contrary by top officials in the Trump Administration.

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Is Scott Pruitt on the campaign trail?

President Donald Trump's EPA chief is getting a lot of airtime as he travels across the country, causing some strategists to suspect he has higher political aspirations.

President Donald Trump's EPA chief is getting a lot of airtime as he travels across the country, causing some strategists to suspect he has higher political aspirations.

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How Trump is enabling famine.

The president’s love for the despotic regimes of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates is perpetuating the crisis.

Last month, eight large private U.S. relief organizations formed an unprecedented alliance to call Americans’ attention to the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II: 20 million people at imminent risk of famine in four countries, including millions of children the United Nations says are “acutely malnourished.” Thinking of the popular anti-famine movements of the 1980s and ’90s, the groups enlisted support from big corporations and rock stars; the hope was to get through to the 85 percent of Americans whom polling showed were unaware of the crisis, and make a dent in the more than $2 billion deficit in funding needed to head off mass starvation.

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Bigger, hotter, faster.
Michael Held

Bigger, hotter, faster.

The wildfires of tomorrow will be like nothing we’ve ever seen. But the debates they’ll spark have already been raging for more than a century.

This is an excerpt from the forthcoming book, Megafire: The Race to Extinguish a Deadly Epidemic of Flame. It has been edited and condensed.

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This technology could stop the world’s deadliest animal.

The capabilities of “gene drive” are thrilling—and also terrifying.

Not long ago, Bill Gates, whose family foundation has spent billions of dollars battling diseases around the globe, noted in his blog that the deadliest animals on the planet are not sharks or snakes or even humans, but mosquitoes. Technically, the bloodsuckers merely host our most dangerous creatures. Anopheles mosquitoes can incubate the protozoae responsible for malaria—a stubborn plague that inspired the DDT treatment of millions of US homes and the literal draining of American swamps during the 1940s to shrink the insects’ breeding grounds. Malaria is now rare in the United States, but it infected an estimated 212 million people around the world in 2015, killing 429,000—mostly kids under five.

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The uninhabitable Earth.
Dikaseva/Unsplash

The uninhabitable Earth.

It is, I promise, worse than you think.

I. ‘Doomsday’

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