chesapeakequarterly net

Top Tweets
permafrost melt orange rivers
Amid LNG’s Gulf Coast expansion, community hopes to stand in its way
Big Oil bankrolling Trump
Heat waves threaten power grid stability with potential blackouts
Black on the Bay, then and now
www.chesapeakequarterly.net

Black on the Bay, then and now

Black Marylanders have always been integral to the Chesapeake Bay community, despite discriminatory laws that tried to hold them back. In this issue, we examine that history in seafood entrepreneurship, sailmaking, aquaculture, oystering, and captaining their own vessels.
A blooming problem
www.chesapeakequarterly.net

A blooming problem

The Chesapeake contains some 700 species of algae. Most don’t cause problems. But when algae does bloom, and creates toxins, it can devastate water bodies as well as economies. With warmer waters coming, could the blooms that happened in Florida in the summer of 2018 happen here?
Newsletter
Smithville tries to stem the tide
www.chesapeakequarterly.net

Smithville tries to stem the tide

Economic pressures took their toll on the African-American community established around the time of the Civil War; now, a marsh threatens its historic church and cemetery. With the water coming, can Smithville hold on to its past?

Newsletter
A forest’s story
www.chesapeakequarterly.net

A forest’s story

Climate change is bringing early springs to the forests. Will they still be able to trap nitrogen and carbon?

ORIGINAL REPORTING
MOST POPULAR
CLIMATE