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Opinion
Wear clothes? Then you're part of the problem
www.nytimes.com

Wear clothes? Then you're part of the problem

Making, washing and tossing apparel has a big environmental cost.

Saving the ocean one outfit at a time.

The sea suffers for fashion. Kombucha leather and leased jeans to the rescue.

Around the world, people buy about 80 billion new garments a year, and Americans alone throw out 15 million tonnes of clothing. Global fast-fashion companies are having a heyday, with Zara owner Inditex and Swedish giant H&M; posting massive sales and regularly ranking on Forbes’s list of most-profitable fashion companies. Clothes have never been cheaper, and anyone can look like an Instagram fashionista or a GQ model for the cost of a couple of medium pizzas.

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Researchers look to nanomaterials to clean air, water and land.

First explored for applications in microscopy and computing, nanomaterials — materials made up of units that are each thousands of times smaller than the thickness of a human hair — are emerging as useful for tackling threats to our planet’s well-being.

Researchers are looking to tiny materials to clean up air, water and land

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These sheets are made with just three things: Cotton, rainwater, and wind power.

Blaynk’s undyed sheets are the color of unadulterated cotton, because they’re not dyed and crafted entirely without chemicals.

It has such a reassuring, healthy ring to it: organic cotton. Falling asleep at night, you imagine that amid organic sheets, you’ll experience a more restful, chemical-free slumber. And while it’s true that the cotton spun into the sheets may have been grown without pesticides, the “organic” label doesn’t cover that which comes after–all the processing, dying, and finishing that injects a fair amount of chemicals into the supposedly pure product.

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