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Into the ice: humans get closer to nature – in pictures.

From log trails to lava houses, from mud baths to melting glaciers, US photographer Lucas Foglia explores our relationship with the natural world in his new book Human Nature.

Photography

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Scientists jam with musicians, artists to stir public passion for nature.

Collaboration between the arts and science can help change the way we look at the environment - and spark debate on how to protect it.

By Megan Rowling

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A man on an eco-mission in mixed media.

The Brooklyn artist Justin Brice Guariglia has turned Greenland’s meltdown into a new show at the Norton Museum of Art.

Last year at the Telluride Film Festival, the artist Justin Brice Guariglia fell into conversation with a stranger.

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These artists are trying to make climate change visceral.

Recognizing that people often act by heart rather than logic, these ten artists aim to help viewers understand the data while developing an emotional attachment that convinces them to do something about it - now.

Climate change data has its problems: It is often lofty and complicated, hard to digest, and even harder to conjure into feelings of urgency. But artists are stepping in to marry data with their crafts, bridging the gap between scientific information and human connection. Recognizing that people often act by heart rather than logic, these ten artists aim to help viewers understand the data while developing an emotional attachment that convinces them to do something about it—now.

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Bringing scientific data to life through art.

Jill Pelto constructs effective ways to communicate science through art.

Bringing Scientific Data to Life through Art: Jill Pelto constructs effective ways to communicate science through art

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Considering 'Mad Max' and other Hollywood dystopias after Trump's exit from Paris accord.

Film and literature — to say nothing of our private insecurities — resound with a world that freezes, boils, chokes, cracks with earthquakes, dwindles with resources and succumbs to pestilence and disease.

Since the plagues of the Old Testament, we have contemplated the Apocalypse, the world rising in vengeance as men, women and children scurry across the brutal landscape of a lost paradise. Skies rain hail, locusts swarm, rivers turn to blood, darkness falls.

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A Maine artist learns, through trial and error, to use art to communicate about climate change.

For Laurie Sproul the transition from artist to activist wasn't easy, but it was necessary.

LIFE & CULTURE Posted Yesterday at 6:56 PM Updated June 18 INCREASE FONT SIZE

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