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Aging infrastructure may create higher flood risk in L.A., study finds

Aging infrastructure may create higher flood risk in L.A., study finds

Between 197,000 and 874,000 city residents could experience a foot of flooding during an extreme storm, scientists found. Most of them don’t live in beachfront mansions.
Fires, then floods: Risk of deadly climate combination rises

Fires, then floods: Risk of deadly climate combination rises

A new study found that the dangerous pairing of disasters may become more common in the American West as rains trigger runaway surges of mud and debris in areas damaged by wildfire.
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Photo by Kait Herzog on Unsplash

Colorado's bad air this summer may be the best you'll see

Along Colorado's Front Range, bad air is becoming the summer norm. And while this year's pollution, which data shows is some of the worst in decades, may bother you now, it is relatively benign compared with what scientists project for the future.

A hopeful forecast: More accurate long-term predictions
www.nytimes.com

A hopeful forecast: More accurate long-term predictions

Improving technology could make it possible to better anticipate weather conditions weeks in advance, especially in the tropics.
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Forests emerge as a major overlooked climate factor
www.quantamagazine.org

Forests emerge as a major overlooked climate factor

When Abigail Swann started her career in the mid-2000s, she was one of just a handful of scientists exploring a potentially radical notion: that the green plants living on Earth's surface could have a major influence on the planet's climate.

Yes, global warming will be bad. But these scientists say it won’t reach the worst-case scenario
www.washingtonpost.com

Yes, global warming will be bad. But these scientists say it won’t reach the worst-case scenario

Climate change won't get as bad as we dread, a new study finds. But we're not going to get off easy, either.
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