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Trump picks NASA chief, NOAA second-in-command.

President Donald Trump has announced his picks for two prominent science-related positions in his administration.

Breaking: Trump picks NASA chief, NOAA second-in-command

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Pushing the storage horse with a nuclear waste cart: the spent fuel pool problem.

In June, Energy Secretary Rick Perry gave a case of heartburn to US nuclear reactor operators when he testified before the House Energy and Water Appropriations Committee in support of the department’s proposed budget for fiscal 2018.

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Why the scariest nuclear threat may be coming from inside the White House.

Does anyone in the White House really understand what the Department of Energy actually does? And what a horrible risk it would be to ignore its extraordinary, life-or-death responsibilities?

On the morning after the election, November 9, 2016, the people who ran the U.S. Department of Energy turned up in their offices and waited. They had cleared 30 desks and freed up 30 parking spaces. They didn’t know exactly how many people they’d host that day, but whoever won the election would surely be sending a small army into the Department of Energy, and every other federal agency. The morning after he was elected president, eight years earlier, Obama had sent between 30 and 40 people into the Department of Energy. The Department of Energy staff planned to deliver the same talks from the same five-inch-thick three-ring binders, with the Department of Energy seal on them, to the Trump people as they would have given to the Clinton people. “Nothing had to be changed,” said one former Department of Energy staffer. “They’d be done always with the intention that, either party wins, nothing changes.”

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Rick Perry is wrong: The grid is ready for renewables.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry is expected to issue a report saying renewables pose a threat to the electricity grid. But the truth is that advances in technology and battery storage are making the grid ever-more capable of accommodating wind and solar power.

JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES

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France, India to cooperate in fighting climate change.

French President Emmanuel Macron and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Saturday their countries would cooperate in the fight against climate change, just days after the U.S. withdrew from the Paris climate agreement.

By Geert De Clercq | PARIS

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Usually fractious Freedom Caucus works quietly on energy.

When Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.) led the first major rewrite of the nation's chemical safety rules in four decades last year, he made sure to check in with an increasingly powerful bloc of conservatives: the House Freedom Caucus.

When Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.) led the first major rewrite of the nation's chemical safety rules in four decades last year, he made sure to check in with an increasingly powerful bloc of conservatives: the House Freedom Caucus.

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UK nuclear industry faces Brexit fall-out.

Leaving the EU treaty that prevents radioactive waste falling into the wrong hands could prove costly for the UK nuclear industry.

Battered sign on a truck carrying radioactive material. Image: Blake Burkhart via Flickr

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