Our top 5 long reads of 2020

In-depth reporting that you may have missed.

We've made it to the final week of 2020—a big accomplishment in a year that felt never-ending.

With the holidays here, you may have a little more time to relax. Wondering what to do with that time? We've got you covered.


Kick up your feet, grab a mug of your favorite hot drink and settle in to catch up on our top five long reads of the year. From the ocean floor to the forests of North Carolina to the blustery North, below are our top investigations and features.

1. Unplugged: Abandoned oil and gas wells leave the ocean floor spewing methane

Gulf of Mexico oil and gas drilling

The Gulf of Mexico is littered with tens of thousands of abandoned oil and gas wells, and toothless regulation leaves climate warming gas emissions unchecked.

2. How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

3. ‘Them plants are killing us’: Inside a cross-border battle against cancer and pollution

Air pollution Sault Ste. Marie Ontario

Two communities — one in Canada, one in the U.S. — share both a border along the St. Marys River and a toxic legacy that has contributed to high rates of cancer. Now the towns are banding together to fight a ferrochrome plant.

4. Microplastics in farm soils: A growing concern

Researchers say that more microplastics pollution is getting into farm soil than oceans—and these tiny bits are showing up in our fruits, veggies, and bodies.

5. Exempt from inspection: States ignore lead-contaminated meat in food banks

Hunter-donated meat provides crucial protein to US food banks. But an EHN investigation found a lack of oversight that could result in potentially hundreds of thousands of lead-contaminated meals this year.

Banner photo: The Algoma steel plant after sunset, in Sault Ste., Marie, Ont., on Friday, Jan., 17, 2020. (Credit: Christopher Katsarov Luna/EHN)

Want more clean energy? Focus on people, not technology

Energy decisions can be deeply personal. We need to listen to households and communities before we prescribe their energy transition.

To prevent pipes from freezing, set the thermostat in your house no lower than 55°F, an article tells me.

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How Appalachia can survive a post-industrial America

The pathway to Appalachia's survival depends on whether it can train workers and attract 21st century businesses.

e360.yale.edu

Why the market for 'blue carbon' credits may be poised to take off

Seagrasses, mangrove forests, and coastal wetlands store vast amounts of carbon. But can the blue carbon market avoid the pitfalls that have plagued land-based programs?

A more efficient and sustainable trucking industry

In this week’s episode of our ‘World Changing Ideas’ podcast, we talked to the 2020 winner of the Transportation category, a company that helps pack cargo trucks more efficiently.
www.fastcompany.com

Wasteless's electronic price tags lower the cost of groceries as they get older

Fruit that will get thrown out next week would be cheaper than fruit that expires later. If you’re going to eat it that day, you can save.

A poultry plant, years of groundwater contamination and, finally, a court settlement

Residents in Millsboro, Delaware, sued the local Montaire facility, which they suspect is linked to their cancers and other serious health problems.

www.nytimes.com

Japan’s plan for Fukushima wastewater meets a wall of mistrust in Asia

The government in Tokyo says criticism of its intention to release treated water into the ocean is unscientific. South Korea has called the proposal “utterly intolerable.”