www.nature.com

Changing storminess and global capture fisheries

Climate change-driven alterations in storminess pose a significant threat to global capture fisheries. Understanding how storms interact with fishery social-ecological systems can inform adaptive action and help to reduce the vulnerability of those dependent on fisheries for life and livelihood.

How Appalachia can survive a post-industrial America

The pathway to Appalachia's survival depends on whether it can train workers and attract 21st century businesses.

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e360.yale.edu

Why the market for 'blue carbon' credits may be poised to take off

Seagrasses, mangrove forests, and coastal wetlands store vast amounts of carbon. But can the blue carbon market avoid the pitfalls that have plagued land-based programs?

A more efficient and sustainable trucking industry

In this week’s episode of our ‘World Changing Ideas’ podcast, we talked to the 2020 winner of the Transportation category, a company that helps pack cargo trucks more efficiently.
www.fastcompany.com

Wasteless's electronic price tags lower the cost of groceries as they get older

Fruit that will get thrown out next week would be cheaper than fruit that expires later. If you’re going to eat it that day, you can save.

A poultry plant, years of groundwater contamination and, finally, a court settlement

Residents in Millsboro, Delaware, sued the local Montaire facility, which they suspect is linked to their cancers and other serious health problems.

www.nytimes.com

Japan’s plan for Fukushima wastewater meets a wall of mistrust in Asia

The government in Tokyo says criticism of its intention to release treated water into the ocean is unscientific. South Korea has called the proposal “utterly intolerable.”
www.nytimes.com

Could the pandemic prompt an 'epidemic of loss' of women in the sciences?

Even before the pandemic, many female scientists felt unsupported in their fields. Now, some are hitting a breaking point.