EHN named finalist for investigative reporting fellowship

A solutions-focused project covering environmental injustice in rural Virginia and North Carolina is one of six finalists for the Doris O'Donnell Innovations in Investigative Journalism Fellowship

In an effort to bolster its strong track record of investigating under-reported environmental injustice issues, Environmental Health News is one of six finalists for the prestigious Doris O'Donnell Innovations in Investigative Journalism Fellowship.


The fellowship, run by The Center for Media Innovation at Point Park University, is designed to bring accountability reporting to underserved news market. The winner will receive $20,000 and will have six months to produce a final story or series of stories.

EHN's proposed project would investigate climate-related environmental injustice in rural Virginia and North Carolina coasts—a region with increased flooding and extreme weather impacts, dwindling newspapers, and the largest population of color at risk of a catastrophic storm outside of New Orleans.

EHN would partner with social justice nonprofit Virginia Organizing to more deeply engage with residents, broaden the reach of the reporting, and move the needle on climate justice.

"The time for writing news stories and hoping they reach the right people is past," said Douglas Fischer, Executive Director of Environmental Health Science, which publishes EHN. "We need to be embedded in the communities most impacted by climate change and take a more active role in turning journalism into justice."

The project would be EHN's latest investigation on environmental justice in North Carolina:

EHN is in strong company, other finalists for the fellowship include the Houston Chronicle, Mississippi Today, WESA-FM, and Pittsburgh's Postindustrial Media.

"In the first year of this fellowship, our goals were simple – to attract a wide-ranging and diverse set of submissions from all around the country that would highlight stories not otherwise being told," said Andrew Conte, director of the Center for Media Innovation, in a statement. "I could not be happier with the results"

The winner will be announced September 10.

Meet the man who unwittingly triggered the war over gas stoves

Richard Trumka Jr., son of a famous labor leader, suggested the Consumer Product Safety Commission might regulate or even ban gas stoves. The internet exploded.
Sunrise in the woods

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

UK gardeners are planting the seeds of a more resilient food system

By collecting the seeds that grow best in their own plots, a movement of gardeners is boosting biodiversity in a way that more closely mimics nature.

Oil industry takes offshore fracking case to Supreme Court

The fossil fuel industry is asking the Supreme Court to resolve a legal battle over hydraulic fracturing off the California coast — a fight companies say carries “enormous practical and legal significance.”

This fake city shows how extreme cold impacts transportation and infrastructure

See how frigid temperatures and heavy snow can wreak havoc on everything from a city's hospitals and power grid to its rail and air transportation.

Lessons from the Flathead Reservation's comprehensive climate plan

On the Flathead Reservation, a "living document" speaks to thousands of years of history while facing new challenges.

New food diets aim to reduce climate impact

Move over, locavores: A slew of new labels — from "climavore" to "reducetarian" — reflect the trend of people eating with sustainability in mind to reduce their climate "foodprint."

Church helps mining community evolve in dark, warming Arctic

For the lone pastor in this fragile, starkly beautiful environment, the challenge is to fulfill the church’s historical mission of ministering to those in crisis while addressing a pressing and divisive contemporary challenge.

From our Newsroom
oil and gas wells pollution

What happens if the largest owner of oil and gas wells in the US goes bankrupt?

Diversified Energy’s liabilities exceed its assets, according to a new report, sparking concerns about whether taxpayers will wind up paying to plug its 70,000 wells.

Paul Ehrlich

Paul Ehrlich: A journey through science and politics

In his new book, the famous scientist reflects on an unparalleled career on our fascinating, ever-changing planet.

oil and gas california environmental justice

Will California’s new oil and gas laws protect people from toxic pollution?

California will soon have the largest oil drilling setbacks in the U.S. Experts say other states can learn from this move.

popular stories 2022

Our 5 most popular reads from 2022

A corpse, woodworking dangers, plastic titans ... revisit the stories that stuck with our readers this past year.

Pittsburgh environmental

What I learned reporting on environmental health in Pittsburgh in 2022

For a lot of people, 2022 felt like the first “normal” year since 2020. It didn’t for me.

Stay informed: sign up for The Daily Climate newsletter
Top news on climate impacts, solutions, politics, drivers. Delivered to your inbox week days.