www.motherjones.com

Here’s what we’ve learned about hurricanes since Sandy

2017 has been a wild year for hurricanes - and as a result scientists - according to Rebecca Leber - understand a lot more about how climate change affects extreme weather.

It turns out we often ask what we can learn from various catastrophic weather events and other ecological disasters:

    • According to Joe Romm at ThinkProgress, Hurricane Sandy was a wakeup call that the GOP, Donald Trump, and the media refuse to answer.
    • Of course, catastrophes don't just happen on the east coast. The west coast is vulnerable as well, and Nicholas Pinter of UC Davis says states like California need to think about and improve their flood management strategies.
    • Scientists have stuff to learn too; in particular, they are researching what ocean acidification means for marine ecosystems.
    • Finally, Amy Davidson Sorkin of the New Yorker asks what Donald Trump learned from his post-Hurricane Harvey visit to Texas.

Climate politics, Pogo edition

Will an old comic strip expression define upcoming global climate talks?

Is anyone really, truly surprised that President Biden's relatively ambitious plan to address climate change is being axed so quickly from his infrastructure package?

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www.opendemocracy.net

Glasgow’s COP26 is crunch time to save the world from disaster

Looking back on 30 years of climate conferences, Geoffrey Lean recalls the many missed opportunities for change that led us to this boiling point
www.theguardian.com

Concrete: the most destructive material on Earth

After water, concrete is the most widely used substance on the planet. But its benefits mask enormous dangers to the planet, to human health – and to culture itself

Violence, strikes, and India’s farmers want you to see it

A year on, protesters against the country’s agricultural laws are taking an increasingly confrontational approach with the country’s leaders.