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Living on Earth: Beyond the Headlines

Peter Dykstra and Steve Curwood cover the fall of a major fracking company, the end of the road for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, and the shutdown of the contentious Dakota Access Pipeline pending more environmental review. They discuss President Trump's downplaying the lethality of COVID-19, which has hit close to home. And they take a trip back to the 1995 Midwest heat wave that previewed the growing health risks of climate disruption.

As the planet burns, climate spending dwindles in infrastructure bill

When will the US wake up to this crisis?

Rainfall, storms, grasshoppers, wildfires, drought. We've got 'em all right now, folks, in biblical proportions. And yet climate change is still stuck back in the action queue.

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www.forbes.com

Environmental Science And Social Justice Activism Make Extraordinary Bedfellows: A Review Of ‘The World We Need.’

'The World We Need: Stories and Lessons from America’s Unsung Environmental Movement' is a gripping new anthology published by The New Press and edited by Brooklyn-based journalist Audrea Lim. It expertly shows how and why environmental science and social justice activism must work together.
www.reuters.com

Greenland experienced 'massive' ice melt this week, scientists say | Reuters

With climate change fueling high temperatures across the Arctic, Greenland lost a massive amount of ice on Wednesday with enough melting to cover the U.S. state of Florida in 2 inches (5.1 cm) of water, scientists said.
newsinteractive.post-gazette.com

Burning for bitcoin

Some power generators — finding they can make more money supplying electricity to Bitcoin-mining operations than selling it to the grid — are shifting focus.

apnews.com

Floods make thousands homeless in Bangladesh Rohingya camps

Days of heavy rainfall have pounded Rohingya refugee camps in southern Bangladesh, destroying dwellings and sending thousands of people to live with extended families or in communal shelters.