2018 election

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Poll shows strong voter support for suing oil companies over climate impact
Amid LNG’s Gulf Coast expansion, community hopes to stand in its way
Trump vows to dismantle Biden’s electric vehicle policies
gardens biodiversity climate resilience
Peter Dykstra: Midterms go eco-AWOL
Credit: Tim Evanson/flickr

Peter Dykstra: Midterms go eco-AWOL

Climate and environmental issues were deeply impacted by the midterm elections, but once again, were absent from any prominent discussion

Every 45 minutes or so on Election Day, I was treated to the televised strains of "Come Fly With Me," a 1957 crooners' standard made famous by Frank Sinatra.

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The House Science Committee may soon become... pro-science
www.wired.com

The House Science Committee may soon become... pro-science

“Hopefully we will no longer see the science committee used as a messaging tool for the fossil fuel industry,” says Rep. Bill Foster, a science committee member.
Midterm election voters shot down a carbon tax, but it'll rise again
www.wired.com

Midterm election voters shot down a carbon tax, but it'll rise again

Washington voters will likely shoot down a ballot initiative that would tax carbon emissions, but carbon pricing is still likely to reach the US.
Environment issues figure in many 2018 mid-term races, ballots
www.sej.org

Environment issues figure in many 2018 mid-term races, ballots

Climate, environment and energy issues figure prominently in the upcoming Nov. 6 elections, whether in individual races, ballot measures or significant power shifts.

Environmental groups shift strategies to win support for candidates in midterms
thehill.com

Environmental groups shift strategies to win support for candidates in midterms

Conservation groups are linking the threat of global warming to health care and other prominent issues as they seek to win more support for candidates backing climate change policies in the midterms.
Climate change: NC Republicans more open to discussion

Climate change: NC Republicans more open to discussion

North Carolina elected Republicans are more willing to say the climate is changing and humans have some impact. But large differences remain between the parties on what to do next.
LCV says Carlos Curbelo’s climate change record took a step back

LCV says Carlos Curbelo’s climate change record took a step back

Miami Republican Carlos Curbelo’s climate-change record took a step back in the eyes of the League of Conservation Voters in 2017.
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