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What would an entirely flood-proof city look like?

The wetter the better. From sponge cities in China to ‘berms with benefits’ in New Jersey and floating container classrooms in the slums of Dhaka, we look at a range of projects that treat storm water as a resource rather than a hazard.

They call it “pave, pipe, and pump”: the mentality that has dominated urban development for over a century.

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Big polluters are headed to Germany for UN climate talks.

They all have ties to the fossil fuel industry.

They all have ties to the fossil fuel industry.

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Meet the high-tech buses of tomorrow.

They’re zero-emissions. They drive themselves. And they’re longer than a blue whale. Can the humble city bus get a modern makeover?

When French mathematician Blaise Pascal* introduced the world’s first public bus service to Paris in 1662, it was little more than a fleet of seven horse-drawn carriages that ran along three regular routes, carrying six to eight passengers each. (Perhaps too novel for its times, the idea didn’t really catch on until the 1800s.)

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Amid GOP wave, transit measures still win approval across the Southeast.

Voters approved ballot measures to expand and improve bus service, build light rail and commuter rail, and invest in bus rapid transit in growing metro areas, rejecting only two of ten proposed tax increases, bonds and other inducements for public transit.

Across the Southeast yesterday, voters approved ballot measures to expand and improve bus service, build light rail and commuter rail, and invest in bus rapid transit in growing metro areas, rejecting only two of ten proposed tax increases, bonds and other inducements for public transit.

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Can we make our cities more sustainable?
Partnership for the Delaware Estuary/flickr

Can we make our cities more sustainable?

A conversation with Michael Renner of the Worldwatch Institute, asking: "Can a city really be sustainable?"

Istanbul, Mexico City, London, New York, Cape Town - sprawling metropolises have become home to nearly 4 billion people. And they continue to grow - over the next three decades, urban populations are expected to increase to 6 billion.

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Carmageddon: Can electric jeepneys ease Manila's traffic crisis?

The capital of the Philippines has some of the worst traffic in the world, costing the metro area an estimated £45m a day. While some pin their hopes on new road projects, others think e-jeepneys could be part of the solution.

The capital of the Philippines has some of the worst traffic in the world, costing the metro area an estimated £45m a day. While some pin their hopes on new road projects, others think e-jeepneys could be part of the solution

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Administration proposes 'bold' climate rule for highways.

The Federal Highway Administration is considering measuring the success of state and local transportation projects by their greenhouse gas emissions.

The Federal Highway Administration is considering measuring the success of state and local transportation projects by their greenhouse gas emissions.

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