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Warming oceans may make ‘Nemo’ harder to find.

Heat bleaches sea anemones, too, causing the iconic clownfish to stop laying eggs. Here’s how.

Like coral reefs, sea anemones—with their flashy, tentacle-like polyps that waggle and wave in vibrant reds, greens, pinks, and yellows—provide homes and hiding spots for dozens of fish species, most memorably the orange clownfish made famous in Finding Nemo. Also like coral, rising water temperatures associated with climate change can severely weaken these anemones, causing them to expel the tiny symbionts that keep them alive and lend them color, a process known as bleaching.

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Jellyfish seek Italy's warming seas. Can't beat 'em? Eat 'em.

While tourists throughout Europe seek out Apulia, in Italy’s southeast, for its Baroque whitewashed cities and crystalline seas, swarms of jellyfish are also thronging to its waters.

MARINA di GINOSA, Italy — As a small boat loaded with wet suits, lab equipment and empty coolers drifted into the warm turquoise sea, Stefano Piraino looked back at the sunbathers on the beach and explained why none of them set foot in the water.

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In an acidified ocean, box jellyfish will gobble up all the food.

As the oceans become more acidic, box jellyfish may start eating a lot more. Their greedy appetites could have a huge impact on marine ecosystems.

By Christie Wilcox

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Is climate change bringing more deadly stingers to Coast?

An increase in stingers, including members of the deadly irukandji family, will be the focus of a new study looking to identify the effects of climate change on the Sunshine Coast's marine life.

AN INCREASE in stingers, including members of the deadly irukandji family, will be the focus of a new study looking to identify the effects of climate change on the Coast's marine life.

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Underwater cypress forest from ice age reveals its secrets.

Deep beneath the waves, miles from the coast of Alabama, lies a primeval underwater forest, a grove of giant cypress trees so fresh that their trunks still ooze sap when they're cut.

Deep beneath the waves, miles from the coast of Alabama, lies a primeval underwater forest, a grove of giant cypress trees so fresh that their trunks still ooze sap when they're cut.

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My depressing summers in Belize.

I spend the hot months in the water, studying ocean ecosystems. What I see happening to our coral reefs is deeply alarming.

My Depressing Summers in Belize

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Climate change has changed the geography of Honduras’ Caribbean coast.

The sea is encroaching fast in the coastal area of Balfate, along Honduras’ Caribbean Coast, where natural barriers are disappearing and the sea is advancing many meters inland.

Biodiversity, Caribbean Climate Wire, Climate Change, Development & Aid, Editors' Choice, Environment, Featured, Global Governance, Headlines, IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse, Latin America & the Caribbean, Poverty & SDGs, Projects, Regional Categories, Special Report

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