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Colorado River Indian Tribes gain control of their water rights

Colorado River Indian Tribes gain control of their water rights

The Colorado River Indian Tribes have secured an agreement that allows them to manage their water allocation beyond their lands, aiming to address regional drought issues.

Noel Lyn Smith reports for Inside Climate News.

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States present divergent plans for Colorado River water rationing

States present divergent plans for Colorado River water rationing

Officials from states sharing the Colorado River have submitted differing proposals to the federal government on managing severe reductions in the river’s flow due to climate change, with disagreements on equitable distribution of these cutbacks.

Jennifer Yachnin reports for E&E News.

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Newsletter
Drought prompts states along Colorado River to draft separate water cut plans

Drought prompts states along Colorado River to draft separate water cut plans

In the face of persistent drought, states divided by the Colorado River are presenting individual plans to manage water shortages.

Jennifer Yachnin reports for E&E News.

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colorado river

Colorado River's future: a complex challenge amid climate change

The Colorado River, vital for 40 million people, faces an uncertain future due to climate change.

Joshua Partlow reports for the Washington Post.

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Colorado river crop farming
Credit: Russ Allison Loar/Flickr

Will a shrinking Colorado River shrivel the produce aisle?

The U.S. gets its leafy greens and other fresh produce from the Southwest in winter. Less Colorado River water could mean higher prices or more imported.

produce aisle vegetables supermarket
Photo by nrd on Unsplash

Will a shrinking Colorado River shrivel the produce aisle?

The U.S. gets its leafy greens and other fresh produce from the Southwest in winter. Less Colorado River water could mean higher prices or more imported.

Colorado River states are racing to agree on cuts before Inauguration Day
Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

Colorado River states are racing to agree on cuts before Inauguration Day

California, Arizona and others, fearing a political shake-up of negotiating teams after the November election, are aiming to wrap up work this year.
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