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Facing imminent water crises, Mexico City and Bogotá seek solutions

Facing imminent water crises, Mexico City and Bogotá seek solutions

Mexico City and Bogotá are on the brink of severe water shortages, reminiscent of Cape Town's 2018 crisis, due to El Niño-induced drought.

Jake Bittle reports for Grist.

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Mexico City's water crisis deepens amid urban growth and climate change

Mexico City's water crisis deepens amid urban growth and climate change

A convergence of climate change, urban sprawl, and deteriorating infrastructure has intensified Mexico City's water crisis, pushing it toward a potential "Day Zero" this summer.

James Wagner, Emiliano Rodríguez Mega, and Somini Sengupta report for The New York Times.

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Newsletter
Mexico City's water crisis intensifies amid heatwave and poor management

Mexico City's water crisis intensifies amid heatwave and poor management

Mexico City, home to nearly 22 million people, faces an acute water shortage, with many residents going days to weeks without water. The situation is described as unprecedented by the city's water system director, Rafael Carmona.

Li Cohen reports for CBS News.

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Axolotl
Image by LaDameBucolique from Pixabay

What it takes to save the Axolotl

On the outskirts of Mexico City, biologists are working to reintroduce a treasured amphibian to the wild. But first they must revive an ancient method of farming.
A bicycle built for transporting cargo takes off

A bicycle built for transporting cargo takes off

Cargo bikes — which can carry everything from passengers to produce — are increasingly being used in place of greenhouse gas-emitting cars, trucks and vans.
sinking cities climate

Coastal cities are sinking faster than sea-level rise

Some of the world’s major cities are sinking even faster than the sea levels around them are rising.

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Mexico City subsidence
www.wired.com

Mexico City could sink up to 65 feet

Due to a phenomenon called subsidence, the metropolis's landscape is compacting—and parts of the city are now dropping a foot and a half each year.
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