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In an era of climate change, Alaska’s predators fall prey to politics
Photo by J-Photos on Unsplash

In an era of climate change, Alaska’s predators fall prey to politics

With Alaska's caribou herds shrink, agencies are culling predators like bears and wolves. The true threat is much more complex.
The Galapagos penguin, one of the world's rarest, sees a glimmer of hope

The Galapagos penguin, one of the world's rarest, sees a glimmer of hope

Biologists created a unique method to boost numbers of the tropical bird—and it seems to be working.

Enormous pigeon-eating catfish wreaking havoc on Europe’s ecosystems
www.nationalgeographic.com

Enormous pigeon-eating catfish wreaking havoc on Europe’s ecosystems

The continent’s largest freshwater fish, native to Eastern Europe, is an invasive species that threatens native fish already in decline.
25 years after returning to Yellowstone, wolves have helped stabilize the ecosystem
www.nationalgeographic.com

25 years after returning to Yellowstone, wolves have helped stabilize the ecosystem

New research shows that by reducing populations and thinning out weak and sick animals, wolves have a role in creating resilient elk herds.
How much is a whale worth? Millions to combat climate change

How much is a whale worth? Millions to combat climate change

The benefits provided by great whales, including capturing carbon, make a powerful case for protecting them, according to economists.
Michael Parr: We’re losing birds at an alarming rate. We can do something about it
www.washingtonpost.com

Michael Parr: We’re losing birds at an alarming rate. We can do something about it

In the past 50 years, North America has lost 3 billion birds. Luckily, we know how to reverse the decline.

Climate change will spark a blue crab baby boom. Then predators will relocate from the south and eat them
www.washingtonpost.com

Climate change will spark a blue crab baby boom. Then predators will relocate from the south and eat them

A new study promised a rare positive development from global warming for Maryland’s favorite crustacean. But bad news wasn’t far behind.
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