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Newsletter
Climate change & zoonotic diseases
BEV Norton/ Flickr

Climate change could introduce humans to thousands of new viruses

To prevent future pandemics, we need to connect the dots between the spread of disease and the destruction of the planet.

oregon pollution wildfires covid
www.kgw.com

Which masks will protect against wildfire smoke?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, wildfire smoke can irritate your lungs, cause inflammation, affect your immune system and make you more prone to lung infections, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

We could save trillions by paying for nature-based pandemic prevention

We could save trillions by paying for nature-based pandemic prevention

We know pandemics come from interactions between humans and wildlife. Nature-based pandemic prevention measures could protect us in the future, as long as we fund them adequately.
Newsletter
Thomas E. Lovejoy: To prevent pandemics, stop disrespecting nature

Thomas E. Lovejoy: To prevent pandemics, stop disrespecting nature

A leading conservationist and biodiversity scholar, with decades of experience in the Amazon, reflects on the lessons of COVID-19.
The surprising link between consumer habits and deadly diseases
ensia.com

The surprising link between consumer habits and deadly diseases

From age-old malaria to COVID-19, markets influence systems that drive pandemic risk. Here's what we can do about it.

Public health depends on a healthy planet
newrepublic.com

Dominick A. DellaSala, William J. Ripple, Franz Baumann: Public health depends on a healthy planet

Zoonotic diseases like Covid-19 are a classic example of where ecosystems and human health intersect.
Air pollution could make people more vulnerable to COVID-19
undark.org

Air pollution could make people more vulnerable to COVID-19

Air pollution hits harder in communities of color. Such exposures could lead to increased risks for those infected by the novel coronavirus.
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