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Rewetting England’s lowland peat could help meet emissions target, says study

Rewetting about half of England’s lowland peat would be enough to deliver a fifth of the greenhouse gas emissions savings needed from the country’s farming by 2030, research suggests.

virginia wetlands climate impacts

Virginia's critical wetlands are marching inland

As sea level rises, some of Virginia's most valuable coastal wetlands, from the Chesapeake Bay marshes to the Great Dismal Swamp, are at risk of either being lost or migrating father inland.

fracking threatens Colombian wetland

In a Colombian wetland, oil woes deepen with the arrival of fracking

A century of oil extraction has failed to yield the promised social and economic dividends, while compromising local water resources.

Salt marshes will vanish in less than a century if seas keep rising and California keeps building, study finds
www.latimes.com

Salt marshes will vanish in less than a century if seas keep rising and California keeps building, study finds

Salt marshes along the entire West Coast could disappear by 2110, according to a new study by a team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey. The research quantifies for the first time the fate of this entire ecosystem on the West Coast, based on current projections of sea level rise.

Trump’s sellout of American heritage.

It’s easy to forget that the president is doing real damage to things that all of us share.

Opinion | CONTRIBUTING OP-ED WRITER

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Beyond biodiversity: A new way of looking at how species interconnect.

In a development that has important implications for conservation, scientists are increasingly focusing not just on what species are present in an ecosystem, but on the roles that certain key species play in shaping their environment.

In 1966, an ecologist at the University of Washington named Robert Paine removed all the ochre starfish from a short stretch of Pacific shoreline on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The absence of the predator had a dramatic effect on its ecosystem. In less than a year, a diverse tidal environment collapsed into a monoculture of mussels because the starfish was no longer around to eat them.

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Everyone knew Houston’s reservoirs would flood — except for the people who bought homes inside them.

Despite concerns about flooding in and around the Addicks and Barker reservoirs, government officials prioritized development.

by Neena Satija, The Texas Tribune and Reveal, Kiah Collier, The Texas Tribune, and Al Shaw, ProPublica, October 12, 2017

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