Trump environmental policy

(Credit: USDA)

Amid the non-stop Trump news, don't ignore the persistent assault on the environment

These days, the front pages and cable gabfests are nearly all-Trump: Impeachment hearings, Presidential Twitty-fits, pardon-a-paloozas and more.


American news organizations, particularly TV news, choose to devote little bandwith or interest to Trump's relentless, ongoing assault on environmental protection.

Thus, these actions, which carry impacts that will be felt for decades, are carried out with relative stealth.

Trump's EPA chief Andrew Wheeler, a former coal industry lobbyist, took another step toward unbuilding the regulatory wall in late January by finishing off what was left of the Obama-era Waters of the United States rule.

Wheeler's new rule would remove Clean Water Act protections from thousands of small or seasonal waterways and nearly half of America's wetlands, limiting the landmark 1973 law to "navigable" waterways.

Don't ever accuse Wheeler of being a thoughtless guest who forgets to bring a hospitality gift. In January, he railed against the Obama rule when invited to speak to two trade groups who fought against the old rule – the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Association of Home Builders. The two powerful groups, who had long regarded the EPA as a regulatory nemesis, greeted its new boss warmly.

This week, the Washington Post reported that the administration plans to roll back limits on mercury emissions from coal burning power plants. Problem is, some utilities say they don't need such government help. Exelon, a utility giant that's made no secret of its desire to move out of the coal business, has said a very public "no thanks."

Similarly, the White House is rolling back Obama's sharp planned increase in vehicle fuel efficiency, despite several automakers' insistence that the higher standards set by Obama were perfectly fine.

Last July, EPA announced that they would take no action to restrict agricultural use of chlorpyrifos, a widely used pesticide for apples, oranges, strawberries, wheat, corn, and other billion dollar crops. Studies linking chlorpyrifos to neurological damage in children have led to bans in multiple states.

One might think that the largest maker of the substance would be grateful for the EPA having its back, but in early February, Corteva announced it will stop making chlorpyrifos. You may not be familiar with Corteva. It's the offspring of the Dow-DuPont merger. The young spinoff is spooked not only by the state bans in Hawaii, California and others, but also by potentially crippling litigation from farm-field neighbors who claim they're harmed by spraying on nearby farms.

Cable news wakes up to climate change 

But for environmental advocates, even a toxic cloud has a silver lining. There are more signs that broadcast news is shaking off its climate silence.

On February 16, 60 Minutes offered 14 of those minutes to a heartbreaking look at Australia's devastating wildfires. Unlike most U.S. accounts, the most-watched news show in American history focused on the climate-wildfire link.

MSNBC anchor Ali Velshi has frequently covered climate change, but last week, he went off on a Howard Beale-like rant on Big Oil's role in distracting and dissembling.

As of last summer, CNN's Bill Weir carries the weighty title of "Chief Climate Correspondent," which sort of implies that there's an army of Deputy Climate Correspondents. The "Chief" is the only one at the network, but one is the high-water mark for full-time climate/environment folks at American networks. And he does quality work. So does my former CNN colleague Miles O'Brien, now at the PBS NewsHour.

CNN also hosted a remarkable all-climate Town Hall for the Democratic presidential candidates in September. MSNBC followed suit.

ABC's Nightline went to Antarctica last spring to document not just climate impacts, but the presence of plastics and heavy metals in marine mammals. Not to be outdone, CBS News went to Greenland in September to report on the decline of the ice sheet there; also in September, NBC sent venerable weatherman Al Roker to Greenland and anchor Lester Holt to Alaska.

Too little, too late? Maybe, but welcome just the same.

Peter Dykstra is our weekend editor and columnist. His views do not represent those of Environmental Health News, The Daily Climate or publisher, Environmental Health Sciences. He can be reached at pdykstra@ehn.org or on Twitter at @Pdykstra.

Trump's environmental protection rollbacks quietly continue, but there are more signs of climate awakening in TV news.

Failure of the universities: The culture gap is now near lethal
Credit: The U.S. National Archives and Defense Visual Information Distribution Service

Universities are failing us

Our educational systems are failing to prepare people for existential environmental threats

Our educational systems are failing to prepare people for existential environmental threats
Keep reading...Show less
Sunrise in the woods

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

Hurricane Fiona destroyed many of Puerto Rico's agricultural crops

Small farms dot much of the landscape of Puerto Rico. Many have been seriously damaged by Hurricane Fiona.

Exxon’s long-shot embrace of carbon capture in the Houston area just got massive support from Congress

But many analysts and environmentalists remain deeply skeptical, maintaining that capturing carbon emissions as a climate change fix is at best a sideshow.

Super Typhoon Noru makes landfall in Philippines; authorities on alert

The typhoon is forecast to bring large waves, torrential rains and wind gusts of up to 127 miles per hour to the northern Philippine island of Luzon.

How Kenya became the world's geothermal powerhouse

An effort that began 70 years ago is poised to propel the country to middle-income status on a wave of green energy.

Tropical storm Ian moves closer to Florida

The storm is expected to become a hurricane by Monday afternoon and reach “major” hurricane strength by Tuesday as it reaches western Cuba.

Dodging blackouts, California faces new questions on its power supply

Extreme heat is testing the way energy is generated, delivered and traded — and raising the prospect of perpetual emergencies.

From our Newsroom
Shell's new petrochemical complex in southwestern Pennsylvania

The Titans of Plastic

Pennsylvania becomes the newest sacrifice zone for America’s plastic addiction.

Ruth Greenspan Bell: Wealth and the climate dilemma

Ruth Greenspan Bell: Wealth and the climate dilemma

Developing countries that increase their fossil fuel production are at a crossroads: securing their own long-term well-being or earning revenue to finance programs to support immediate economic growth.

Solving the climate crisis will help both ‘sacrifice zones’ and ‘cute’ puffins

Solving the climate crisis will help both ‘sacrifice zones’ and ‘cute’ puffins

Curbing pollution for families in Chicago calms the climatic conditions that drive fish away from puffins half a continent away.

puffin tern recovery climate change

Good news: A good year for puffins and terns, despite climate change

A visit to a remote Maine island finds puffins and terns rebounding despite climate change

Optimism in the climate change fight

Optimism in the climate change fight

So much is happening so quickly. With the climate bill now law, here's what you need to know.

Colorado fracking

How Colorado is preventing PFAS contamination from the oil and gas industry

And how other states, including Pennsylvania, could do the same.

Stay informed: sign up for The Daily Climate newsletter
Top news on climate impacts, solutions, politics, drivers. Delivered to your inbox week days.