Originals

Solar power on the rise at US schools

Report finds an 81% increase in K-12 schools using solar power over the last 5 years.

When Mount Desert Island High School in Maine decided to use solar power, they turned to the students.

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Popular

A Northeast US climate initiative has had a major side benefit—healthier children

A climate change initiative in the Northeastern U.S. designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions has also greatly reduced harmful air pollution and related impacts to kids' health, such as asthma, preterm births and low birth weights, according to a new study.

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Good News

Editorial: Bicycling is having a moment—let’s use it to make riding more safe and inclusive

When you're a member of the media you receive notice of a lot of "days"—Pancake day, National Lame Duck Day, Textiles Day. But today is World Bicycle Day, and that means something to me. And, if you care about the environment, it should to you as well.

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Credit: BlackRockSolar/flickr
Solutions

Climate change: For big emissions reductions, we need to think small

Small-scale clean energy and low carbon technologies—such as solar panels, smart appliances and electric bicycles—are more likely to push society toward meeting climate goals than large-scale technologies, according to a new study from a team of international researchers.

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Credit: Annie Spratt/Unsplash
Solutions

Editorial: Keep the community

Venture in any forest—from your city park to swaths of protected old growth—and you will see trees both big and small, young and old, and of different species all standing together.

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Indigenous children in Caquetá, Colombia. (Credit: Stiven Gaviria/Unsplash)
Impacts

The planet’s largest ecosystems could collapse faster than we thought

If put under the kind of environmental stress increasingly seen on our planet, large ecosystems —such as the Amazon rainforest or the Caribbean coral reefs—could collapse in just a few decades, according to a study released today in Nature Communications.

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A rusty patched bumble bee. (Credit: USFWS)
Impacts

“Climate chaos” and bumble bee extinctions

Bumble bee populations are declining at a rate "consistent with a mass extinction" and warming temperatures in Europe and North America are at least partly to blame, according to a study published today in Science.

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From our Newsroom

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Wreck on the Green Highway

Most of us are trying to forget Tuesday night's debate debacle. But one interaction is worth revisiting.

Climate change will continue to widen gaps in food security, new study finds

Countries already struggling with low crop yields will be hurt most by a warming climate.

Why environmental justice needs to be on the docket in the presidential debates: Derrick Z. Jackson

If you want to talk about the inequality in our economy, COVID-19, race, and silent violence in our cities, you need to start with environmental injustice.

The Daily Climate

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