Good News

Editorial: Bicycling is having a moment—let’s use it to make riding more safe and inclusive

As we celebrate a World Bicycle Day like no other—let's keep the momentum and attention the coronavirus pandemic has brought to bicycling.

When you're a member of the media you receive notice of a lot of "days"—Pancake day, National Lame Duck Day, Textiles Day. But today is World Bicycle Day, and that means something to me. And, if you care about the environment, it should to you as well.

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Credit: BlackRockSolar/flickr
Solutions

Climate change: For big emissions reductions, we need to think small

Small-scale clean energy and low carbon technologies—such as solar panels, smart appliances and electric bicycles—are more likely to push society toward meeting climate goals than large-scale technologies, according to a new study from a team of international researchers.

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Credit: Annie Spratt/Unsplash
Solutions

Editorial: Keep the community

Venture in any forest—from your city park to swaths of protected old growth—and you will see trees both big and small, young and old, and of different species all standing together.

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Indigenous children in Caquetá, Colombia. (Credit: Stiven Gaviria/Unsplash)
Impacts

The planet’s largest ecosystems could collapse faster than we thought

If put under the kind of environmental stress increasingly seen on our planet, large ecosystems —such as the Amazon rainforest or the Caribbean coral reefs—could collapse in just a few decades, according to a study released today in Nature Communications.

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A rusty patched bumble bee. (Credit: USFWS)
Impacts

“Climate chaos” and bumble bee extinctions

Bumble bee populations are declining at a rate "consistent with a mass extinction" and warming temperatures in Europe and North America are at least partly to blame, according to a study published today in Science.

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The Tatanka Wind Farm on the border in both North and South Dakota. (Credit: USFWS)
Solutions

Renewables could be a health boon for Great Lakes, Upper Midwest regions

Installing more wind turbines in the Upper Midwest, and more solar panels in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions, would bring the largest health gains and benefits from U.S. renewable energy, according to a new Harvard University analysis.

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Solutions

Global renewable energy has quadrupled over past decade

Renewable energy capacity quadrupled across the planet over the past decade and energy from solar power increased 26 times from what it was in 2009, according to an international report released today.

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From our Newsroom

Plastic pollution, explained

How plastics damage our lives and the environment—and why recycling is not the answer.

Climate change creates camouflage confusion in winter-adapted wildlife

Twenty-one species molt from brown to white to survive the winter season. But climate change has created a mismatch between their snowy camouflage and surroundings.

They blinded us with SCIENCE!

From climate change to COVID-19, even the clearest warnings from scientists can misfire with millions of Americans. Pop culture may be a big reason why.

Fracking linked to rare birth defect in horses: Study

The implications for human health are "worrisome," say researchers.

Of water and fever

While we're rightly distracted by fighting a virus, are we ignoring other "just" wars over water?

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