A rusty patched bumble bee. (Credit: USFWS)
Impacts

“Climate chaos” and bumble bee extinctions

As temperatures warm, bumble bees can't take the heat.

Bumble bee populations are declining at a rate "consistent with a mass extinction" and warming temperatures in Europe and North America are at least partly to blame, according to a study published today in Science.

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The Tatanka Wind Farm on the border in both North and South Dakota. (Credit: USFWS)
Solutions

Renewables could be a health boon for Great Lakes, Upper Midwest regions

Installing more wind turbines in the Upper Midwest, and more solar panels in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions, would bring the largest health gains and benefits from U.S. renewable energy, according to a new Harvard University analysis.

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Solutions

Global renewable energy has quadrupled over past decade

Renewable energy capacity quadrupled across the planet over the past decade and energy from solar power increased 26 times from what it was in 2009, according to an international report released today.

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Credit: Viv Lynch/flickr
Impacts

Surprise! Unexpected ocean heat waves are becoming the norm

Ocean heat waves, which can push out fish, plankton and other aquatic life, are happening far more frequently than previously thought, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Mo catching up on some reading. (Credit: Brian Bienkowski)
Solutions

Welcome our hardworking interns — and, hey, whatcha reading?

Summer is upon us — and things are heating up at EHN.

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Solutions

Global electricity access grows—but we're not on track for 2030 sustainable energy goals

More people on the planet have access to electricity than ever before, however, the world is on pace to fall short on the goal of affordable and sustainable energy for all by 2030, according to an international report on the state of international energy.

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Credit: Bo Eide/flickr
Impacts

From making it to managing it, plastic is a major contributor to climate change

Plastic is polluting oceans, freshwater lakes and rivers, food and us — but it's also a major contributor to global climate change, warns a new report.

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