Impacts

Babies born near natural gas flaring are 50 percent more likely to be premature: Study

Researchers link air pollution from burning off excess natural gas to preterm births for babies; with the most pronounced impacts among Hispanic families.

Living near fracking operations that frequently engage in flaring—the process of burning off excess natural gas—makes expectant parents 50 percent more likely to have a preterm birth, according to a new study.

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Causes

Air pollution from fracking killed an estimated 20 people in Pennsylvania from 2010-2017: Study

Particulate matter pollution emitted by Pennsylvania's fracking wells killed about 20 people between 2010 and 2017, according to a soon-to-be-published study.

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Causes

Fracking linked to rare birth defect in horses: Study

A new study has uncovered a link between fracking chemicals in farm water and a rare birth defect in horses—which researchers say could serve as a warning about fracking and human infant health.

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Causes

Pittsburgh region is a hotspot for air pollution and COVID-19 deaths: Report

PITTSBURGH—Allegheny County is among the 10 percent of U.S. counties that have both high relative density of major air pollution sources and high relative rates of COVID-19 deaths, according to a new report.

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Impacts

Oil and gas methane emissions in US are at least 15% higher than we thought

Methane emissions are vastly undercounted at the state and national level because we're missing accidental leaks from oil and gas wells, according to a new study.

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Solutions

When coal plants decrease pollution or shut down, people have fewer asthma attacks

Asthma attacks decreased significantly among residents near coal-fired power plants after the plants shut down or upgraded their emission controls, according to a new study.

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Mother taking the temperature of her daughter with an ear thermometer. (Credit: Kelly Sikkema/Unsplash)
Impacts

Kids with asthma who live near heavy air pollution face greater risk from coronavirus

PITTSBURGH—Kids who have asthma and live near industrial polluters may face higher risk from novel coronavirus and its resulting disease COVID-19 in the coming months.

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From our Newsroom

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Wreck on the Green Highway

Most of us are trying to forget Tuesday night's debate debacle. But one interaction is worth revisiting.

Climate change will continue to widen gaps in food security, new study finds

Countries already struggling with low crop yields will be hurt most by a warming climate.

Why environmental justice needs to be on the docket in the presidential debates: Derrick Z. Jackson

If you want to talk about the inequality in our economy, COVID-19, race, and silent violence in our cities, you need to start with environmental injustice.

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