climate politics
www.csmonitor.com

Will ambitious rhetoric about climate change lead to real action?

Almost all world leaders now say they are taking the threat of climate change seriously, and some are pledging more money to the fight. But at this year's climate summit, will their actions match their words?

Comic: Adapting Oaxacan corn for tortillas—and new markets—in the Pacific Northwest

In this illustrated report, we explore how the nonprofit is working with local farmers, scientists, and chefs to adapt crops to new environments—and the changing climate.
Sunrise in the woods

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

airplane flying silhouette sun
commons.wikimedia.org

Innes FitzGerald: The teen turning down championships for the planet

Athlete Innes FitzGerald turned down flying to compete in Australia due to the climate emergency.

Is climate change affecting the polar vortex?

In 2021, a cold wave swept across the U.S., bringing freezing temperatures as far south as Texas. Millions of people lost power, and hundreds died. Yale Climate Connections meteorologist Bob Henson says this cold wave was caused by disruptions to the polar vortex.

Climate change may drive fungi to harm our bodies

Bacteria and viruses have been drivers of deadly global pandemics and annoying infections. But the pathogens we haven’t had to reckon with as much—yet—are the fungi.

climate oxygen water ocean
Photo by Silas Baisch on Unsplash

The ocean twilight zone could store vast amounts of carbon captured from the atmosphere

An ocean scientist describes plans for an ‘internet of the ocean,’ with sensors and autonomous vehicles that can explore the deep sea and monitor its vital signs.
san luis canal california aqueduct water
commons.wikimedia.org

California floated cutting major Southwest cities off Colorado River water before touching its agriculture supply

In a closed-door negotiation last week over the fate of the Colorado River, representatives from California’s powerful water districts proposed modeling what the basin’s future would look like if some of the West’s biggest cities – including Phoenix and Las Vegas – were cut off from the river’s water supply.

farming bill politics climate
Image by davispigeon0 from Pixabay

Congress' 'biggest fight' over climate? It's the farm bill

Forget electric vehicles, wind turbines or pipelines. Congress’ most consequential climate battles this year are more likely to revolve around dirt and cows.

From our Newsroom
oil and gas wells pollution

What happens if the largest owner of oil and gas wells in the US goes bankrupt?

Diversified Energy’s liabilities exceed its assets, according to a new report, sparking concerns about whether taxpayers will wind up paying to plug its 70,000 wells.

Paul Ehrlich

Paul Ehrlich: A journey through science and politics

In his new book, the famous scientist reflects on an unparalleled career on our fascinating, ever-changing planet.

oil and gas california environmental justice

Will California’s new oil and gas laws protect people from toxic pollution?

California will soon have the largest oil drilling setbacks in the U.S. Experts say other states can learn from this move.

popular stories 2022

Our 5 most popular reads from 2022

A corpse, woodworking dangers, plastic titans ... revisit the stories that stuck with our readers this past year.

Pittsburgh environmental

What I learned reporting on environmental health in Pittsburgh in 2022

For a lot of people, 2022 felt like the first “normal” year since 2020. It didn’t for me.

Stay informed: sign up for The Daily Climate newsletter
Top news on climate impacts, solutions, politics, drivers. Delivered to your inbox week days.