'... and it confounds the science.'

The Parody Project takes on Donald Trump's alt-facts.

The Parody Project published this nicely done spoof back in August. Sadly, it remains relevant today. Now it's gone viral with the science crowd.


And it is particularly apt for the season, given that the Simon and Garfunkel hit topped the charts in the U.S. on Jan. 1, 1965.

(Trivia note: the duo first released the song in 1964, and its initial commercial failure led to Simon and Garfunkel's breakup. Producer Tom Wilson remixed the track, adding more amped guitar. The new version erosion has hit the airwaves in September '65.)

The parody, by Don Caron (who plays Art Garfunkel in a glorious wig; Linda Gower does an oh-so-serious Paul Simon), is "sadly accurate," according to one commentator.

We strive to stay nonpartisan at Environmental Sciences, but attacks on science have cut a little close to the bone. This is worth a listen.

View it on YouTube.

Climate politics, Pogo edition

Will an old comic strip expression define upcoming global climate talks?

Is anyone really, truly surprised that President Biden's relatively ambitious plan to address climate change is being axed so quickly from his infrastructure package?

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