Britain proposes unlimited fines for car emissions cheaters

Carmakers that try to cheat vehicle emissions tests could face unlimited fines and criminal charges under proposals set out on Thursday by the British government.
www.ctvnews.ca

Some polar bears are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice: study

New research shows that a small subpopulation of polar bears that used to live on thick, multiyear sea ice are getting a short-term benefit from the ice thinning as temperatures warm.

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www.theguardian.com

What is carbon capture, usage and storage - and can it trap emissions?

Technology that can keep carbon dioxide emissions from entering the atmosphere and stoking global heating will be essential to tackle the growing climate crisis, experts say. But how does it work, and why will it make a difference in fighting climate breakdown?

MAP: See the toxic sites near you that are threatened by climate change

New Jersey has the most Superfund sites facing climate threats, followed by Florida, California and Pennsylvania.
Photo by Kouji Tsuru on Unsplash

Carney backs call for climate risk to be baked into company financial accounts

United Nations climate envoy Mark Carney on Thursday threw his weight behind a growing push by investors for companies to more accurately reflect climate-related risks in their financial accounts.
www.climatechangenews.com

Trudeau promises green jobs for Canada as his leadership hangs in the balance

Justin Trudeau promised to make climate action a "cornerstone" of Canada's coronavirus recovery plan, but has yet to win the backing he needs in parliament.

www.upi.com

Spots of shade may help butterflies cope with climate change

Butterfly species vary widely in their ability to regulate body temperature, according to a new survey in Britain. The research, published this week in the Journal of Animal Ecology, suggests species that rely on shade to cool down are most vulnerable to climate change.

www.nytimes.com

Ocean heat waves are directly linked to climate change

Six years ago, a huge part of the Pacific Ocean near North America quickly warmed, reaching temperatures more than 5 degrees Fahrenheit above normal. Nicknamed "the blob," it persisted for two years, with devastating impacts on marine life, including sea lions and salmon.