Developing nations to study ways to dim sunshine, slow warming

Scientists in developing nations plan to step up research into dimming sunshine to curb climate change, hoping to judge if a man-made chemical sunshade would be less risky than a harmful rise in global temperatures.


The existential trap of solar geoengineering

With so much at risk from climate change, scientists in developing nations understandably argue they must be at the table as these technologies are explored for their benefits and costs (see commentary in Nature). This story from Reuters explores an initiative, the Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative (SRMGI.org) that is facilitating developing nation engagement in assessing solar geoengineering.

Let's hope their deliberations encompass the existential threat these technologies pose: One they are employed, they give excuses to avoid reducing carbon emissions. Yet once they are deployed, what happens if major societal disruptions bring them to a halt (for example, if financial collapse means there are no longer resources to pay for them)? The carbon emissions that were permitted to enter the atmosphere because of the promise of solar geoengineering will likely rapidly assert their impact on global temperatures. Any assessment of solar geoengineering must examine this endgame.

There are other obvious risks, most especially that solar geoengineering to lessen temperature increases does nothing to prevent further accumulation of carbon dioxide in the oceans and fresh water bodies, exacerbating acidification.

See the full story in Reuters.

www.desmogblog.com

These agribusiness groups with ties to climate denial are trying to influence the US-UK trade deal

These groups represent industries worth billions of dollars, and are supported by some of the world's largest polluters.

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

www.stltoday.com

On St. Louis visit, US secretary of agriculture talks climate change, dicamba, and more

"First of all, I don't agree with your premise that the administration is dismissive of climate change," said U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue.

Local impacts of wildfire smoke connected to rise in recent deaths, researchers say

California deaths due to wildfire smoke on the rise, as most of the state was exposed to heavy concentrations of dangerous chemicals during massive wildfires.
www.ctvnews.ca

Some polar bears are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice: study

New research shows that a small subpopulation of polar bears that used to live on thick, multiyear sea ice are getting a short-term benefit from the ice thinning as temperatures warm.
www.theguardian.com

What is carbon capture, usage and storage - and can it trap emissions?

Technology that can keep carbon dioxide emissions from entering the atmosphere and stoking global heating will be essential to tackle the growing climate crisis, experts say. But how does it work, and why will it make a difference in fighting climate breakdown?

MAP: See the toxic sites near you that are threatened by climate change

New Jersey has the most Superfund sites facing climate threats, followed by Florida, California and Pennsylvania.
Photo by Kouji Tsuru on Unsplash

Carney backs call for climate risk to be baked into company financial accounts

United Nations climate envoy Mark Carney on Thursday threw his weight behind a growing push by investors for companies to more accurately reflect climate-related risks in their financial accounts.