Developing nations to study ways to dim sunshine, slow warming

Scientists in developing nations plan to step up research into dimming sunshine to curb climate change, hoping to judge if a man-made chemical sunshade would be less risky than a harmful rise in global temperatures.


The existential trap of solar geoengineering

With so much at risk from climate change, scientists in developing nations understandably argue they must be at the table as these technologies are explored for their benefits and costs (see commentary in Nature). This story from Reuters explores an initiative, the Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative (SRMGI.org) that is facilitating developing nation engagement in assessing solar geoengineering.

Let's hope their deliberations encompass the existential threat these technologies pose: One they are employed, they give excuses to avoid reducing carbon emissions. Yet once they are deployed, what happens if major societal disruptions bring them to a halt (for example, if financial collapse means there are no longer resources to pay for them)? The carbon emissions that were permitted to enter the atmosphere because of the promise of solar geoengineering will likely rapidly assert their impact on global temperatures. Any assessment of solar geoengineering must examine this endgame.

There are other obvious risks, most especially that solar geoengineering to lessen temperature increases does nothing to prevent further accumulation of carbon dioxide in the oceans and fresh water bodies, exacerbating acidification.

See the full story in Reuters.

We’re dumping loads of retardant chemicals to fight wildfires. What does it mean for wildlife?

As western wildfires become bigger and more intense, state and federal fire agencies are using more and more aerial fire retardant, prompting concerns over fish kills, aquatic life, and water quality.

As the Caldor Fire roared toward drought-stricken Lake Tahoe in the last days of August, firefighters faced a sobering scenario: Strong winds increased from the southwest, pushing the fire toward populated areas and prompting tens of thousands to flee.

Keep reading... Show less

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

Photo by Oz Seyrek on Unsplash

In search of ‘Lithium Valley’: why energy companies see riches in the California desert

Firms say what's underneath the Salton Sea could fuel a green-energy boom. But struggling residents have heard such claims before.

Carbon, caribou and a Dene Tha’ plan to protect a northern Alberta lake

The nation is proposing the first Indigenous Protected and Conserved Area in the province to protect the region surrounding one of Alberta' largest lakes, which stores five times more carbon per square metre than the Amazon.

WATCH: This man is fighting climate change by managing 100,000 acres of forest

Produced by Colby College, this film features conservationist Steve Tatko. Managing over 100,000 acres of Maine forest for the Appalachian Mountain Club, Tatko focuses on techniques that promote natural regeneration rather than planting trees.

Pa. community’s fight against electric lines shows tensions coming with push toward a clean energy future

To achieve a carbon-free electricity sector, the country would need to more than double the power infrastructure it has now in the next decade.

Young people take to the streets of Pittsburgh, demanding climate action

Local students called for the region to end get out of coal, gas and petrochemicals. The event was part of a worldwide student climate strike.