WATCH: The economics of biodiversity

'It is neither advisable nor possible to separate diversity from other qualities of the vital living fabric of our planet's surface.'

A landmark global review of economics and biodiversity finds our global economies are "embedded within nature." Widespread failure to recognize that truth, the study found, endangers livelihoods, well-being, and the prosperity of future generations.


The "Dasgupta Review" was commissioned by the United Kingdom's HM Treasury and was led by economist and professor Sir Partha Dasgupta, a Frank Ramsey Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of Cambridge.

The review warns that governments and institutions have failed to work with nature in a sustainable way in "that our demands far exceed its capacity to supply us with the goods and services we all rely on."

"Biodiversity is declining faster than at any time in human history. Current extinction rates, for example, are around 100 to 1,000 times higher than the baseline rate, and they are increasing. Such declines are undermining nature's productivity, resilience and adaptability, and are in turn fueling extreme risk and uncertainty for our economies and well-being," the authors wrote.

Sir Dasgupta and Nobel-prize winning biologist Sir Venki Ramakrishnan discuss the report, along with Prince Charles and Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and explore its implications and potential solutions in the video above.

See the full report.

To save water supply, Eastern Shore poultry farmers may get perks to switch aquifers

To save the Eastern Shore of Virginia’s limited drinking water, it’s time for chicken farms to tap into an alternative supply, officials say.

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

A Syrian seed bank’s fight to survive

Scientists have raced to safeguard a newly precious resource: plants that can thrive in a changing climate.

Microplastics may be cooling—and heating—Earth’s climate

Tiny bits of plastic are swirling in the sky, and a new model suggests they could be subtly affecting the climate.

Homeowners wait for long-promised state hurricane relief

Coastal residents whose homes were damaged or destroyed by hurricanes Matthew and Florence say they're frustrated with long delays, caseworker turnover and unfulfilled promises from Rebuild NC.

What IEA’s path to net-zero emissions means for Canada’s oilsands, LNG

Looking at different policy scenarios around climate change, agency report lays out path for holding warming to 1.5 C

Salmon need trees

A study shows that watershed logging can be as bad for salmon numbers as increased predation in the ocean.

The key insight that defined 50 years of climate science

A climate scientist has won the Nobel Prize in Physics for the first time. It’s a reminder that the field, which emerged from the mid-20th century’s biggest questions, hasn’t always been fraught.