Reporters gather to talk environment, health, climate

The world's largest gathering of environmental journalists kicks off today in Fort Collins, Colo.

The world's largest gathering of environmental journalists starts today, with hundreds of journalists focusing on climate change, energy development, water scarcity, population growth and environmental health.


The Society of Environmental Journalists' 29th Annual Conference kicks off at the Colorado State University campus in Fort Collins, Colo. Much of the discussion will focus on the strain explosive growth in recent decades has placed on environmental health and sustainability goals.

EHN.org senior editor Brian Bienkowski will be there, hosting a Saturday panel on environmental justice and harmful chemical exposures. And EHN.org regional reporter Kristina Marusic will travel from Pittsburgh to accept her honorable mention for beat reporting during the SEJ Journalism Awards luncheon. Follow them on Twitter at @EnvirHealthNews, @TheDailyClimate and @KristinaSaurusR.

The five-day conference includes sessions on climate change, energy development, water scarcity and politics, public lands management, agriculture and social justice (and injustice). "These are themes and topics central to this region—and to the rest of the country and the world," write conference co-chairs Susan Moran, a freelance journalist and host of KGNU's science show, "How On Earth", and Joshua Zaffos, a High Country News correspondent and environmental communications instructor at Colorado State University.

You can also track reactions and insight gleaned by reporters—and sources—from across the nation and world as events unfold by tracking the hashtag #SEJ2019.

Full agenda

Wednesday starts with workshops on covering Indian Country and climate change, among others, and include speakers such as Ed Maibach of George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication.

Thursday shifts the entire conference to the field for reporting trips to the state's oil and gas fields, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Rocky Mountain National Park, among other destinations.

Friday and Saturday are dedicated to plenary and concurrent sessions, including Bienkowski's session on environmental justice and endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure. Speakers include Patricia Hunt of Washington State University, Tamarra James-Todd of Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health and freelance reporter Lynne Peeples.

Sunday concludes with authors Joel Berger, Beth Gardiner, Heather Hansman and Laura Pritchett talking books and botany.

Climate activists pan carbon capture plans

'There are still no projects operating anywhere in the world that have delivered on time, on budget, or in the quantities promised.'

More than 500 environmental and community groups – from the Nassau Hiking & Outdoor Club to Greenpeace USA – have called on United States and Canadian leaders to abandon efforts to capture carbon emissions from fossil fuels and work harder to curb fossil fuel use in the first place.

Keep reading... Show less

Get our Good News newsletter

Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

www.eenews.net

Front-line communities bet on Biden. Can his EJ plan deliver?

The scope and complexity of President Biden's environmental justice plan is unprecedented. That's a reminder of what could still go wrong - but also a sign of how differently he is approaching the issue.

insideclimatenews.org

Judge scales back climate scientist's case against bloggers

A Washington, D.C. judge has ruled that the conservative think tank the Competitive Enterprise Institute cannot be held responsible for an outside blogger's 2012 online attack on a prominent climate scientist.

www.axios.com

Australian wildfires' climate influence outweighed that of lockdowns

The COVID-19 pandemic-related lockdowns exerted a slight net warming effect on the planet, but Australian wildfires had a much bigger and faster climate impact, cooling the planet from December 2019 through mid-2020, a new study finds.

www.independent.co.uk

Mercedes to go all electric by 2030

Mercedes says that from 2025 all newly launched vehicle architectures would be electric-only, referring to mechanical structures that can be shared among different models.

Review of U.S. federal oil, gas leasing program being finalized

A highly anticipated review by the U.S. Interior Department of the federal oil and gas leasing program is undergoing final internal review and should be released "very soon," Interior Secretary Deb Haaland told a Senate hearing recently.

wdet.org

Southeast Michigan grappling with new climate realities

Large floods have been devastating Southeast Michigan throughout the summer, and the intensifying storms can be linked directly to a warming climate.