Help make science loud in 2018 - support our work today

We were strong in 2017 thanks to engaged readers like you. Let's keep that work going in the New Year.

I'm proud of our work over the past year. Engaged readers like you made it possible, and I hope you'll take a moment to see what impact you had – and what opportunities lie ahead of us. Because you should be proud, too.


We moved to a new, nimbler platform this fall. We're going to spend 2018 reaching new readers who might not realize how closely our health and climate change are related.

We also saw an institutional shift. After more than 15 years at the helm, founder and chief scientist Pete Myers stepped aside from day-to-day management this summer. He's still intimately involved – focusing considerable energy and expertise to draw connections among climate, environmental factors and our health.

Priority: Environmental justice

We're on fire with our journalism. In November our sister publication, EHN.org, published Peak Pig, a nine-part series in partnership with NC Policy Watch on the impacts of Big Ag on rural America. No clichés or recycled narratives here — we sent reporters to the heart of hog country and told of rural unrest through the eyes of those who feel voiceless and forgotten. And we saw novel new developments with hog waste and biogas.

We see urgent need to call out environmental injustice. We're looking hard at our carbon footprint and impacts. And veteran editor Peter Dykstra is keeping a sharp eye on climate science and regulatory rollbacks in his Weekend Reader.

Your donation drives this

What's ahead? First, we hope to have your continued support.

Your donation drives good science into public policy and discussion on environmental health. Please consider us as you plan your year-end tax-deductible gifts.

Second, we're watching. Peter Dykstra is tracking rollbacks. We intend to keep a sharp eye on ways science and policy are diverging.

Check our new weekly newsletters

Pete Myers will continue to push forward the science on bisphenol-A and other endocrine-disrupting compounds. Our small staff will continue to curate news from around the world on environmental health and climate. And we are expanding our news pipeline: A new menu of weekly newsletters – all free – and enhanced efforts on Facebook and Twitter.

But it all starts with you, our readers. A small donation makes a huge impact.

You're the caffeine that fuels our early morning and weekend shifts. You're driving the discussion. Let's be loud in 2018.

Contribute a tax-deductible gift today. We're ready to roar.



With deep appreciation,

Douglas Fischer, executive director

Environmental Health Sciences, publisher of EHN.org and DailyClimate.org


Environmental Health News is a program of Virginia Organizing, an umbrella nonprofit that helps us keep overhead costs extremely low. That lets us put more of your donation to work. It also means we have to tell you this:

Virginia Organizing is officially registered with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, P.O. Box 1163, Richmond, VA 23209. You can write to this department for all relevant financial statements and procedures regarding the solicitation of contributions. Your donation is tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

www.nytimes.com

New data shows an 'extraordinary' rise in U.S. coastal flooding

Rising seas are bringing water into communities at record rates, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Tuesday.

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Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

www.nytimes.com

How Facebook handles climate disinformation

Critics say a company policy that exempts opinion articles from fact-checking amounts to a huge loophole for climate change deniers.
www.nytimes.com

Global methane emissions reach a record high

Scientists expect emissions, driven by fossil fuels and agriculture, to continue rising rapidly.
abcnews.go.com

As seaweed becomes a top crop in East Africa, a new program will help farmers grow it sustainably

The Nature Conservancy is launching a new program in Zanzibar to help seaweed farmers develop sustainable practices and improve the resiliency of the important crop.
www.dw.com

Biodiversity blooms in cities when green spaces go wild

Cities are leaving once manicured green spaces to rewild with native flowers and grasses that attract more diverse insects, birds and wildlife.

news.mongabay.com

'In the plantations there is hunger and loneliness': The cultural dimensions of food insecurity in Papua

As palm oil companies take over their land, the Marind people of southern Papua, are struggling to feed themselves.

Top Amazon deforestation satellite researcher sacked by Bolsonaro

Just days after Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro got the bad news that the Amazon 12-month deforestation rate has risen 96% since he took office, his administration fired the researcher overseeing monitoring.
From our Newsroom

Big Oil flows a little bit backward

Pipelines have had a very bad July (so far).

Beyond the “silver lining” of emissions reductions: Clean energy takes a COVID-19 hit

With job loss and stifled development in the renewable energy sector, economists, politicians, and advocates say policy action is necessary to stay on track.

A fracking giant's fall

Chesapeake Energy was a fracking pioneer on a meteoric rise. Last week, it fell to Earth.

Our annual summer reading list, 2020 edition

EHN staff shares their top book recommendations for the summer.

Coronavirus is creating a crisis of energy insecurity

Fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has led to unpaid bills and energy shutoffs in many vulnerable US households. Indiana University researchers warn we need to act now to avoid yet another health emergency.

Ode to Jersey

From shark attacks to the "syringe tide"—a brief look at the highs and lows of New Jersey's environmental past.

The Daily Climate

Top news on climate impacts, solutions, politics, drivers.

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