Help make science loud in 2018 - support our work today

Help make science loud in 2018 - support our work today

We were strong in 2017 thanks to engaged readers like you. Let's keep that work going in the New Year.

I'm proud of our work over the past year. Engaged readers like you made it possible, and I hope you'll take a moment to see what impact you had – and what opportunities lie ahead of us. Because you should be proud, too.


We moved to a new, nimbler platform this fall. We're going to spend 2018 reaching new readers who might not realize how closely our health and climate change are related.

We also saw an institutional shift. After more than 15 years at the helm, founder and chief scientist Pete Myers stepped aside from day-to-day management this summer. He's still intimately involved – focusing considerable energy and expertise to draw connections among climate, environmental factors and our health.

Priority: Environmental justice

We're on fire with our journalism. In November our sister publication, EHN.org, published Peak Pig, a nine-part series in partnership with NC Policy Watch on the impacts of Big Ag on rural America. No clichés or recycled narratives here — we sent reporters to the heart of hog country and told of rural unrest through the eyes of those who feel voiceless and forgotten. And we saw novel new developments with hog waste and biogas.

We see urgent need to call out environmental injustice. We're looking hard at our carbon footprint and impacts. And veteran editor Peter Dykstra is keeping a sharp eye on climate science and regulatory rollbacks in his Weekend Reader.

Your donation drives this

What's ahead? First, we hope to have your continued support.

Your donation drives good science into public policy and discussion on environmental health. Please consider us as you plan your year-end tax-deductible gifts.

Second, we're watching. Peter Dykstra is tracking rollbacks. We intend to keep a sharp eye on ways science and policy are diverging.

Check our new weekly newsletters

Pete Myers will continue to push forward the science on bisphenol-A and other endocrine-disrupting compounds. Our small staff will continue to curate news from around the world on environmental health and climate. And we are expanding our news pipeline: A new menu of weekly newsletters – all free – and enhanced efforts on Facebook and Twitter.

But it all starts with you, our readers. A small donation makes a huge impact.

You're the caffeine that fuels our early morning and weekend shifts. You're driving the discussion. Let's be loud in 2018.

Contribute a tax-deductible gift today. We're ready to roar.



With deep appreciation,

Douglas Fischer, executive director

Environmental Health Sciences, publisher of EHN.org and DailyClimate.org


Environmental Health News is a program of Virginia Organizing, an umbrella nonprofit that helps us keep overhead costs extremely low. That lets us put more of your donation to work. It also means we have to tell you this:

Virginia Organizing is officially registered with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, P.O. Box 1163, Richmond, VA 23209. You can write to this department for all relevant financial statements and procedures regarding the solicitation of contributions. Your donation is tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

environmental justice

LISTEN: Robbie Parks on why hurricanes are getting deadlier

"In places where there are high minority populations they bear, by far, the most burden of deaths from tropical cyclones."

Dr. Robbie Parks joins the Agents of Change in Environmental Justice podcast for a bonus episode to discuss how hurricanes have become deadlier in recent years and how we can better protect vulnerable communities.

Keep reading...Show less
Senator Whitehouse & climate change

Senator Whitehouse puts climate change on budget committee’s agenda

For more than a decade, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse gave daily warnings about the mounting threat of climate change. Now he has a powerful new perch.
louisiana energy efficiency rules
Photo by KT on Unsplash

Louisiana consultant spent 13 years drafting energy efficiency rules

“After 13 years, we can’t call it Quick Start anymore”: Utility opposition to proposed efficiency rules is part of the reason consultants have delayed work for years.

‘In total shock’: Birdwatchers amazed as ‘uber-rare’ American birds land in UK

Birders have flocked in their hundreds to see the songbirds, blown across the Atlantic by Hurricane Lee
fracking energy climate water food
Photo by Brad Weaver on Unsplash

Fracking for oil and gas is devouring American groundwater

A Times analysis shows that increasingly complex oil and gas wells now require astonishing volumes of water to fracture the bedrock and release fossil fuels, threatening America’s fragile aquifers.
japan salarymen emissions energy climate
Big Stock Photo

How Japan’s salarymen embraced short sleeves through ‘cool biz’

Under “Cool Biz,” salarymen and government workers don short-sleeved shirts in the summer as offices are kept above 82 degrees Fahrenheit to save energy.
mammals earth biodiversity
Image by Sasin Tipchai from Pixabay

Mammals’ time on Earth is half over, scientists predict

A new model suggests that in 250 million years, all land will collide into a supercontinent that boosts warming and pushes mammals to extinction.
Feeling anxious about climate change? Check out these strategies
Photo by Joice Kelly on Unsplash

Feeling anxious about climate change? Check out these strategies

The power of embracing despair, building community, and fostering emotional strength in the face of climate challenges.
From our Newsroom
children nature

Opinion: When kids feel the magic of nature, they will want to protect it

Improving our quality of life starts with the simple of act of getting kids outdoors.

birds climate change

In the Gulf of Maine, scientists race to save seabirds threatened by climate change

“I could see that, if successful, the methods developed could likely help these species."

fracking economics

Appalachia’s fracking counties are shedding jobs and residents: Study

The 22 counties that produce 90% of Appalachian natural gas lost a combined 10,339 jobs between 2008 and 2021.

Marathon Petroleum y una ciudad de Texas muestran una  potencial crisis de comunicaciones sobre sustancias químicas

Marathon Petroleum y una ciudad de Texas muestran una potencial crisis de comunicaciones sobre sustancias químicas

En los últimos tres años, Marathon ha violado repetidamente la ley de Aire Limpio y tuvo tres emergencias en el semestre de febrero a julio de 2023.

WATCH: How Marathon Petroleum and one Texas city show the potential for a chemical communication crisis

WATCH: How Marathon Petroleum and one Texas city show the potential for a chemical communication crisis

Marathon in Texas City has repeatedly violated the Clean Air Act and had three emergencies in the span of a six month period.

air pollution heart attack

ER visits for heart problems plummeted after Pittsburgh coal processor shut down

Levels of one highly-toxic pollutant fell by 90% and ER visits for heart problems decreased by 42% immediately after the shutdown.

Stay informed: sign up for The Daily Climate newsletter
Top news on climate impacts, solutions, politics, drivers. Delivered to your inbox week days.