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Weekend Reader: Absurd extreme weather & more.

Top Weekend News


Commentary from EHN/Daily Climate's Peter Dykstra: Environmental advocates have a mixed record in court lately, and the victories smell worse than the setbacks.


Monsanto faces a whopping $289 million verdict in the case of a California man who said he was poisoned by glyphosate, the key ingredient in Roundup herbicides. (Guardian)

Another collaboration between ProPublica and West Virginia's Gazette-Mail: What happened when West Virginia regulators killed a pipeline proposal.

A must-read collaboration between Undark Magazine and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting: The unseen global toll of air pollution.

The Democratic National Committee appears poised to backtrack on its pledge to refrain from accepting fossil fuel donations. (HuffPost)

How much debris washed into Chesapeake Bay from the recent torrential rains? (Baltimore Sun)

Interesting perspective from NPR's ombudsman on including mention of climate change in wildfire stories.

Opinion Pieces and Editorials

From the NYT: Where there's fire, President Trump blows smoke.

From the Times of San Diego: EV's may be the Trump Administration's next target.


The Latest from Trumpville

From Outside Online: If you've only been following Scott Pruitt's antics. you've been missing the real damage in environmental rollbacks.

From Emily Atkin in The New Republic: Air pollution denial could become EPA policy.


(Credit: Coast Guard News/flickr)

How coastal communities can prepare for the challenges of storms and rising seas

What can a small or medium sized community do to be better prepared for risks of storms and rising seas?

Major coastal storms commonly kill hundreds of people and wreck homes, businesses and communities.

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We're hiring! Looking for a director of audience solutions

From the beginning we have aimed to drive good science and journalism into public discussion and policy on our environment and health. Our mission: Get accurate, impactful, nonpartisan information to the public, allowing them to act with confidence, speed and foresight.

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www.chesapeakequarterly.net

A blooming problem

The Chesapeake contains some 700 species of algae. Most don’t cause problems. But when algae does bloom, and creates toxins, it can devastate water bodies as well as economies. With warmer waters coming, could the blooms that happened in Florida in the summer of 2018 happen here?
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