Weekend Reader:  Award Winners, Southern Delusions & Top News.

SEJ recognizes the year's best in environmental journalism; a few observations from our Weekend Editor on the Solid (and Trumpian) South; and more

The Society of Environmental Journalists annual awards shows the strength and depth of environmental journalism; talk of a Democratic overthrow in the midterm elections is hard to find in the American South.


Payback? A major past donor to Jeff Sessions's campaigns gets some alleged payback in a dispute with EPA.

From theory to in-your-face: Climate scientist Michael Mann says climate impacts are no longer subtle, they're in our faces. From WBUR's Here & Now.

Twp from Alaska on Oil damage: From Inside Climate News: Surrounded by oil fields,an Alaskan village fears for its health.

And from the NYT's Henry Fountain: How new oil projects cut scars across Alaskan wilderness.

Shocker! Green energy passes its first trillion-watt milestone as prices drop. (Bloomberg)

Stellar long-read from The Guardian and Keith Kahn-Harris on Denialism: What drives people to reject the truth.

From Wash Post's Capital Weather Gang: California's Carr Fire became one one the biggest fire tornadoes ever measured.

Essay from NPR's Scott Simon: Calling the press the "enemy of the people" is a menacing move.

Climate denial isn't the only anti-science push that won't die: In this NYT op-ed, Meliinda Winner Moyer says anti-vaxxers still have an impact on vaccine science.

Grist offers a level-headed assessment of the NYT Sunday Magazine's controversial "autopsy" on how the climate movement blew it in thie 1980's.






Facing floods and fires, undocumented immigrants have nowhere to turn for help

Undocumented immigrants are ineligible for aid after disasters like Hurricane Ida and wildfires. Some people are trying to change that.

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Global south suffering gap in climate change research as rich countries drive agenda, studies suggest

Developing countries suffer from a significant gap in terms of scientific research related to climate change, a new study shows, even though they contain the communities and people most vulnerable to extreme weather, rising sea levels and other serious impacts of climate change. 

Drought in northern Kenya pushes millions towards hunger

In northern Kenya, the ribs of dead sheep stretch towards the blazing sun as parched herders trudge past, a day's march from water. The value of their skinny goats is falling as fast as the prices scrawled on the sacks in the market are shooting up.

'Community ownership' might be the best way to fight deforestation

Forests owned, managed and governed by their communities naturally preserve biodiversity and have very low levels of deforestation.

Manchin fires back after Sanders pens op-ed in West Virginia paper

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ move to land an op-ed in Manchin’s backyard seems to have crossed the line for the West Virginia senator.

In elk, a Kentucky professor sees an opportunity to help revitalize Appalachia

One professor is advocating for further expansion of the elk population through a conservation corridor across Appalachia. But, it could be a heavy lift.

How the climate crisis is transforming the meaning of ‘sustainability’

Companies have been taking a ‘sustainability-as-usual’ approach to the climate crisis—a slow and voluntary adoption of commitments—but that may soon come to an end.