This biodegradable bioplastic sucks carbon from the air
www.fastcompany.com

This biodegradable bioplastic sucks carbon from the air

What if more materials not only reduced their own environmental impact, but also actively tried to go farther?
San Luis Valley farms
Jim Germond

Moral questions on a standard San Luis Valley farm

Drought creeps into the San Luis Valley, ruining best-laid farm practices. No clover grows in the meadow cultivated for cattle. In early summer, there wasn’t enough rain to grow forage.
Sunrise in the woods

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Kentucky tornado relief stalled
State Farm/Flickr

Millions in donations were sent for tornado relief. Survivors wonder where the money is.

Most of the $12 million that Kentucky set aside to pay for survivors' unmet needs remains untapped. Gov. Beshear defends rules criticized by local leaders.
TVA climate resilience lacking
Kentucky Photo File/Flickr

As Southeast states warm, TVA criticized on preparations for dealing with climate hazards

Extreme weather patterns will require several improvements to the climate resiliency of Tennessee Valley Authority electrical infrastructure
Pennsylvania advocates issue intent to sue Shell’s new petrochemical plant
Mark Dixon/Flickr

Pennsylvania advocates issue intent to sue Shell’s new petrochemical plant outside Pittsburgh for emissions violations

The complex in Beaver County “blew through” permit limits in its first few months of operation, the advocates say.

An El Niño is forecast for 2023. How much coral will bleach this time?

An El Niño would generate many impacts on both terrestrial and marine ecosystems, including the potential for droughts, fires, increased precipitation, coral bleaching, invasions of predatory marine species like crown-of-thorns starfish, disruptions to marine food chains, and kelp forest die-offs.

the new model for biodiverse cities
Kent Wien/Flickr

Rio de Janeiro and the new model for biodiverse cities

From Rio de Janeiro to Kanazawa, cities all over the globe are being recognized as biodiversity hot spots—and reimagining conservation in the twenty-first century.
wealth leads to higher emissions
Lionel/Flickr

Rich people are boiling the planet

What’s one thing wealthy people of all nationalities have in common? Far higher emissions than the poorer people in their country.
From our Newsroom
oil and gas wells pollution

What happens if the largest owner of oil and gas wells in the US goes bankrupt?

Diversified Energy’s liabilities exceed its assets, according to a new report, sparking concerns about whether taxpayers will wind up paying to plug its 70,000 wells.

Paul Ehrlich

Paul Ehrlich: A journey through science and politics

In his new book, the famous scientist reflects on an unparalleled career on our fascinating, ever-changing planet.

oil and gas california environmental justice

Will California’s new oil and gas laws protect people from toxic pollution?

California will soon have the largest oil drilling setbacks in the U.S. Experts say other states can learn from this move.

popular stories 2022

Our 5 most popular reads from 2022

A corpse, woodworking dangers, plastic titans ... revisit the stories that stuck with our readers this past year.

Pittsburgh environmental

What I learned reporting on environmental health in Pittsburgh in 2022

For a lot of people, 2022 felt like the first “normal” year since 2020. It didn’t for me.

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