A new day – and look – for Daily Climate

Welcome to the faster, more responsive Daily Climate.

We all know our physical world is changing. The news world is, too. And so have we.


We hope you enjoy our new look. We overhauled our site to better reach you – and readers who don't even know us yet. We want to be where you find and consume news.

Increasingly, that's on a phone or tablet, and our new site (and revamped newsletter!) is tailor-made for mobile.

Who among us hasn't stumbled upon a news story this week on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat? Our new platform helps you push information you find noteworthy out to your circle of friends and family.

Even better, we're far more nimble – thanks to our partners at RebelMouse, the New York-based tech firm powering the new DailyClimate.org (as well as our sister site, EHN.org). We can easily react to and report on important developments in climate science and policy.

We're focusing our efforts to quickly get you news you want and need to know. You asked for – and we're now delivering – more "good news." That's not easy to find these days on the climate beat, but we'll do our best to track down a few stories every day.

Our new website is, in many ways, the first baby step in the transformation we need to make as the flow of news and information continues to accelerate. In fact, I'll wager you'll rarely encounter our newly redesigned front page in the future. You'll find us via our newsletters, or Facebook, or Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram.

I like to think we're all the beneficiaries of this. We have a small crew doing this work, but together we have well over a century's worth of experience in science and environmental journalism.

It's time for us to get loud. We promise to keep bringing you journalism that drives the discussion on climate change and environmental health. Thanks for reading us.

Douglas Fischer,

Executive Director, Environmental Health Sciences

Publisher of DailyClimate.org and EHN.org

Climate activists pan carbon capture plans

'There are still no projects operating anywhere in the world that have delivered on time, on budget, or in the quantities promised.'

More than 500 environmental and community groups – from the Nassau Hiking & Outdoor Club to Greenpeace USA – have called on United States and Canadian leaders to abandon efforts to capture carbon emissions from fossil fuels and work harder to curb fossil fuel use in the first place.

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Coral reefs face disaster from climate change if we don’t curb greenhouse gas emissions, report says

To save this underwater ecosystem, researchers argue, we’ll need to reduce global warming, improve local conditions and invest in restoration.
www.nytimes.com

A lawyer known for fighting Chevron was found guilty of contempt of court by a federal judge

The ruling is the latest episode in a long legal battle over the alleged dumping of oil in the Amazon region of Ecuador from the 1960s to the 1990s by Texaco, which Chevron acquired in 2001.
www.nytimes.com

Wildfires ravage Italy's Sardinia region in 'a disaster without precedent'

A 25-mile swath of vegetation, farms and villages is hit by one of the largest wildfires in decades, devastating the Italian tourist destination.
www.nytimes.com

Floods, heat, then floods again: England is battered by wild weather

Thunderstorms in London flooded hospitals’ emergency rooms and submerged streets for the second time this month.
www.nytimes.com