A new day – and look – for Daily Climate

Welcome to the faster, more responsive Daily Climate.

We all know our physical world is changing. The news world is, too. And so have we.


We hope you enjoy our new look. We overhauled our site to better reach you – and readers who don't even know us yet. We want to be where you find and consume news.

Increasingly, that's on a phone or tablet, and our new site (and revamped newsletter!) is tailor-made for mobile.

Who among us hasn't stumbled upon a news story this week on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat? Our new platform helps you push information you find noteworthy out to your circle of friends and family.

Even better, we're far more nimble – thanks to our partners at RebelMouse, the New York-based tech firm powering the new DailyClimate.org (as well as our sister site, EHN.org). We can easily react to and report on important developments in climate science and policy.

We're focusing our efforts to quickly get you news you want and need to know. You asked for – and we're now delivering – more "good news." That's not easy to find these days on the climate beat, but we'll do our best to track down a few stories every day.

Our new website is, in many ways, the first baby step in the transformation we need to make as the flow of news and information continues to accelerate. In fact, I'll wager you'll rarely encounter our newly redesigned front page in the future. You'll find us via our newsletters, or Facebook, or Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram.

I like to think we're all the beneficiaries of this. We have a small crew doing this work, but together we have well over a century's worth of experience in science and environmental journalism.

It's time for us to get loud. We promise to keep bringing you journalism that drives the discussion on climate change and environmental health. Thanks for reading us.

Douglas Fischer,

Executive Director, Environmental Health Sciences

Publisher of DailyClimate.org and EHN.org

Local impacts of wildfire smoke connected to rise in recent deaths, researchers say

California deaths due to wildfire smoke on the rise, as most of the state was exposed to heavy concentrations of dangerous chemicals during massive wildfires.

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Get the best positive, solutions-oriented stories we've seen on the intersection of our health and environment, FREE every Tuesday in your inbox. Subscribe here today. Keep the change tomorrow.

www.ctvnews.ca

Some polar bears are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice: study

New research shows that a small subpopulation of polar bears that used to live on thick, multiyear sea ice are getting a short-term benefit from the ice thinning as temperatures warm.
www.theguardian.com

What is carbon capture, usage and storage - and can it trap emissions?

Technology that can keep carbon dioxide emissions from entering the atmosphere and stoking global heating will be essential to tackle the growing climate crisis, experts say. But how does it work, and why will it make a difference in fighting climate breakdown?

MAP: See the toxic sites near you that are threatened by climate change

New Jersey has the most Superfund sites facing climate threats, followed by Florida, California and Pennsylvania.
Photo by Kouji Tsuru on Unsplash

Carney backs call for climate risk to be baked into company financial accounts

United Nations climate envoy Mark Carney on Thursday threw his weight behind a growing push by investors for companies to more accurately reflect climate-related risks in their financial accounts.
www.climatechangenews.com

Trudeau promises green jobs for Canada as his leadership hangs in the balance

Justin Trudeau promised to make climate action a "cornerstone" of Canada's coronavirus recovery plan, but has yet to win the backing he needs in parliament.

www.upi.com

Spots of shade may help butterflies cope with climate change

Butterfly species vary widely in their ability to regulate body temperature, according to a new survey in Britain. The research, published this week in the Journal of Animal Ecology, suggests species that rely on shade to cool down are most vulnerable to climate change.