A new day – and look – for Daily Climate

Welcome to the faster, more responsive Daily Climate.

We all know our physical world is changing. The news world is, too. And so have we.


We hope you enjoy our new look. We overhauled our site to better reach you – and readers who don't even know us yet. We want to be where you find and consume news.

Increasingly, that's on a phone or tablet, and our new site (and revamped newsletter!) is tailor-made for mobile.

Who among us hasn't stumbled upon a news story this week on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat? Our new platform helps you push information you find noteworthy out to your circle of friends and family.

Even better, we're far more nimble – thanks to our partners at RebelMouse, the New York-based tech firm powering the new DailyClimate.org (as well as our sister site, EHN.org). We can easily react to and report on important developments in climate science and policy.

We're focusing our efforts to quickly get you news you want and need to know. You asked for – and we're now delivering – more "good news." That's not easy to find these days on the climate beat, but we'll do our best to track down a few stories every day.

Our new website is, in many ways, the first baby step in the transformation we need to make as the flow of news and information continues to accelerate. In fact, I'll wager you'll rarely encounter our newly redesigned front page in the future. You'll find us via our newsletters, or Facebook, or Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram.

I like to think we're all the beneficiaries of this. We have a small crew doing this work, but together we have well over a century's worth of experience in science and environmental journalism.

It's time for us to get loud. We promise to keep bringing you journalism that drives the discussion on climate change and environmental health. Thanks for reading us.

Douglas Fischer,

Executive Director, Environmental Health Sciences

Publisher of DailyClimate.org and EHN.org

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www.hcn.org

Will the climate crisis tap out the Colorado River?

Water availability is going from bad to worse in the seven states that rely on the drought-stricken river.
stateimpact.npr.org

At DEP budget hearing, some legislators focus on Pennsylvania's effort to join RGGI

Some Republican lawmakers criticized the agency. Its leader said it’s understaffed.
e360.yale.edu

Brazil has weakened dozens of environmental laws during the pandemic

Since President Jair Bolsonaro took office in January 2019, Brazil has approved 57 pieces of legislation that weaken environmental laws, from relaxing forest protections to declassifying the toxicity of dozens of pesticides, according to a new analysis.

theintercept.com

Fossil fuel execs gloat about profits from Texas storm crisis

Comstock Resources, a shale drilling company, apologized for describing gas prices from the Texas storm as a “jackpot.”

Kentucky bill would allow ban of large solar projects on farmland

A new bill in the Kentucky legislature could ban large-scale solar projects on farmland in the state, out of fears that the growing solar industry could be a detriment to the preservation of productive farmland.

www.northcarolinahealthnews.org

NC groups want state to join climate change fight

If the petition is approved by the Environmental Management Commission, it would force Duke Energy to cap the amount of greenhouse gases it releases.